a container for the psyche in an uncertain world

Log in

DREAMS AND THE ECLIPSE OF GOD: How Personal Complexes and Personal Meaning Often Silence the Archetypal Message in Dreams and Life, Michael Conforti

  • Friday, April 10, 2015
  • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
  • Jung Society Library

Registration


Registration is closed

Friday


An Evening With...

Michael Conforti 

To pray is to dream in league with God -Abraham Joshua Heschel We long for and are terrified to hear the voice of God. This voice provides such an honest commentary and reflection on how we are living and an intimation of a destiny waiting in potentia. So, too, is there an all-too-human need to silence this voice.

It is in God’s warning to not make “graven images,” and Rabbi Heschel’s frustration with our attempts to build a religion out of our personal preferences both speaks to the archetypal tendency to look away from God and the Self and in its place to totemize personal needs and conscious biases. Our collective, modern approach to dreams captures this eternal struggle to clearly listen to and act in accordance with the wisdom of the Psyche, and our denial of these messages.

The dream reveals a truth about life and an inherent meaning not to be muted by individual perception and consciousness. Often the dream’s a priori, archetypal meaning is eclipsed by our personal complexes and reactions to it, thus rending what is sacred and eternal to the secular and profane.

This weekend program will speak to the relationship between the archetypal and personal meaning of dream images, and the symbolic representation of archetypal and personal complexes in dreams and our associations to them. Dreams from clinical practice, the Bible, and from historical figures will be presented to illustrate this theme.

Please note: this is a two-hour program. Attendance on Friday night is not required to attend on Saturday.

Michael Conforti, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst, author, and founder/ director of the Assisi Institute. His work has resulted notonly in a training institute based on his discoveries, but also in the development of a new discipline: Archetypal Pattern Analysis. Dr. Conforti is actively investigating the workings of archetypal fields and the relationship between Jungian psychology and the New Sciences. He lectures nationally and internationally and applies his insights as a sought-after consultant to businesses, government institutions, and the film industry. Dr. Conforti served as script consultant on the recently released film, Pride and Glory, and is the author of Field, Form, and Fate: Patterns in Mind, Nature & Psyche, Threshold Experiences: The Archetype of Beginnings, and the forth-coming Hidden Presence: Complexes, Possessions, and Redemption.

OUR MISSION

The Jung Society of Washington is dedicated to nourishing the human spirit and to serving the longing that comes to us in our dreams and in moments of hardship, imagination, struggle, and creativity.  We support the exploration of our own psychic depths and the primal impulse for personality integration that Dr. Carl Gustav Jung called "individuation".  With a psychological lens, we deepen the discussion of social issues, history, and current events.  We encourage the development of greater self-awareness and creative expression—individually, in relationships, and within the community. 

JUNG SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON
5200 Cathedral Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20016
CALL: 202-237-8109
EMAIL: jungsociety@jung.org

OFFICE HOURS:
Monday - Thursday: 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
LIBRARY HOURS
Tuesday: 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM
EMAIL: junglibrary@jung.org

DIRECTIONS
BY CAR: From MacArthur Blvd., turn east (away from the Potomac River) onto Cathedral at the light between Loughboro and Arizona. 


BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT: D6 bus line.
Parking is available in the streets.
Entrance to the Jung Society library and office is from the side street, Hawthorne Place.


The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit educational institution. Although many of the Jung Society's programs involve analytical psychology and allied subjects, these offerings are intended, and should be viewed, as a source of information and education, and not as therapy. The Jung Society does not offer psychoanalytical or other mental health services.
Images of mandalas throughout this site were created by Carl Jung's patients between the years 1926 and 1945.

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software