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Programs 

"I'm always excited by the materials the Faculty of the Jung Society chooses for the programs whether it's poetry, literature, drama, philosophy, meditation, or expressive arts."
- Jung Society Program Participant

“Thank you for your wonderful programs. The Jung Society has never been more vibrant!”
– Giuliana Reed

    • Tuesday, March 06, 2018
    • Tuesday, March 27, 2018
    • 4 sessions
    • The Sanctuary Room, Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016
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    Course

    A by-product of the necessary adaptations we make to the demands of family and the world around us, and the imbedded messages we carry, causes each of us to get separated from our own truth, our personal authority.  These classes will identify the twenty-one tasks that surface in the second half of life, the addressing of which brings one back to a more authentic journey.   

    Text:   Living an Examined Life: Wisdom for the Second Half of the Journey, James Hollis

    James Hollis, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Washington, D.C., Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington, and author of fourteen books.

    • Friday, March 09, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Butler Board Room, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW Washington D.C. 20016
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    Lecture

    Using Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement as a case study, this lecture explores the opposite but intertwined affects of hope and despair, and their relationship to our ability to take action in times of crisis. King’s complicated history with hope and despair is worth mining for its inspiration and wisdom today, as we too are living in a time of cultural disintegration and collective despair. The lecture will end by offering the symbol of the mandorla as a way to hold the tension of these opposite affects and still take action on behalf of King’s beloved community.  

    Jennifer Leigh Selig, PhD, is on the faculty of Pacifica Graduate Institute, where she was founding chair and current core faculty of the MA/PhD in Depth Psychology with an emphasis in Jungian and Archetypal Studies, and the MA in Engaged Humanities and the Creative Life. She’s been an educator for 28 years, and her publications include Reimagining Education: Essays on Reviving the Soul of Learning; Integration: The Psychology and Mythology of Martin Luther King, Jr. and His (Unfinished) Therapy With the Soul of America; and the forthcoming title Deep Creativity: Reflections on the Intersection of Life, Art, and Soul. Jennifer has been formally studying and speaking on Martin Luther King, Jr for the last 16 years, but has spent her whole life dreaming his dream of the beloved community forward.

    Directions to Community Meeting venue - AUs Butler Board Room.pdf

    • Saturday, March 10, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • The Butler Board Room, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW Washington D.C. 20016
    Register

    Workshop

    Jung believed that religion’s—and by comparison—therapy’s greatest gift was giving people what they need to live a meaningful life: faith, hope, love, and understanding. He called these “the four great gifts of grace” which can both heal the suffering and liberate the soul of humanity.

    This workshop builds on the evening lecture and expands upon Martin Luther King, Jr. as a theologian and a civil rights activist who, along with Jung as a therapist, were those “great and wise men” who possessed and provided faith, hope, love, and understanding to their congregants, to their clients, and to the citizenry at large.

    Participants will be encouraged, through journaling and discussion, to take a current issue where they struggle with despair, and consider it in light of each of these four gifts of grace. Our goal is to come closer to being a “transformed nonconformist,” King’s term for conscious and creative citizen-activists who work on behalf of the beloved community.

    Jennifer Leigh Selig, PhD, is on the faculty of Pacifica Graduate Institute, where she was founding chair and current core faculty of the MA/PhD in Depth Psychology with an emphasis in Jungian and Archetypal Studies, and the MA in Engaged Humanities and the Creative Life. She’s been an educator for 28 years, and her publications include Reimagining Education: Essays on Reviving the Soul of Learning; Integration: The Psychology and Mythology of Martin Luther King, Jr. and His (Unfinished) Therapy With the Soul of America; and the forthcoming title Deep Creativity: Reflections on the Intersection of Life, Art, and Soul. Jennifer has been formally studying and speaking on Martin Luther King, Jr for the last 16 years, but has spent her whole life dreaming his dream of the beloved community forward.

    Directions to Community Meeting venue - AUs Butler Board Room.pdf
    • Monday, March 12, 2018
    • Monday, May 07, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
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    Course

    Synchronicity holds both magic and mystery when it is encountered.  It seems puzzling and unexplainable.  Perhaps we could say that synchronicity is a meaningful coincidence that connects something going on outside us with something happening inside us.  Jung describes synchronicity not as cause and effect but as consisting of an unconscious image that comes into consciousness and an objective situation coinciding with this content and creating emotion and affect. The purpose of this five-week course is to allow opportunities to be self-reflective and open to the possibility of synchronicity, which brings consciousness and meaning to our lives with the opportunity for change.  We will be reading and working with David Richo’s book, The Power of Coincidence: How Life Shows Us What We Need to Know.    

    Rosanne Shepler is a Licensed Professional Counselor and Licensed Psychoanalyst who received her Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute of New York in 2002.  She also holds masters degrees in Health Education and Counseling.  She is a past president of JAWA and a past treasurer of both JAWA and NYAAP.  She is on the Curriculum Committee and Teaching Faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York.  She’s a member of JAWA, the New York Association for Analytical Psychology (NYAAP), the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts (IRSJA), and the International Association of Analytical Psychology (IAAP). 

    • Wednesday, March 14, 2018
    • Wednesday, April 11, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 4
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    Book Exploration Course

    From the Back Matter: Possibly the best one-volume English-language summary of Jung's thought . . . , Murrray Stein develops the cartographical metaphor of the title by beginning with the "surface" (ego) of the psyche and exploring successively more complex areas, including complexes, libido theory, shadow, anima/animus the Self, individuation, and synchronicity.  The map soon resembles the multidisciplinary chart of a solar system more than it does a flat map.  In each subject area, Stein draws heavily on papers that Jung wrote late in his life, but he sets these in the context of Jung's earlier developing thought.  This method allows the author to demonstrate the interconnectedness and coherence of Jung's mature work.

     -- Choice, 10/15/98

    Text: Jung’s Map of the Soul by Murray Stein

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Thursday, March 15, 2018
    • Thursday, April 12, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
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    Course

    “If you do follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while waiting for you and the life you ought to be living is the one you are living.  When you can see that, you begin to meet people who are in the field of your bliss, and they open the doors to you.  I say, follow your bliss and don't be afraid, and doors will open where you didn't know they were going to be.”

    “People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life…I think that what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our life experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonances with our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive.”  Joseph Campbell, The Power of Myth.

    The goals of experiencing “the rapture of being alive” and entering “the field of your bliss” are often not consciously pursued in life. Following your bliss can be an intimidating process and its paradoxical aspects can bring liberation or enslavement. The field of enslavement, at its worst, is littered with the bodies of opioid addicts on skid row or celebrities that seemed to have everything and yet feel worthless and destroy themselves.  Yet the rewards of seeking the liberating and nourishing energy field of bliss are great. Jung says that to attain this “paradisal state of blissfulness” is, “to possess a treasury of accumulated libido which can constantly stream forth.” --“We must now ask ourselves, whence comes this blissful feeling, this ecstasy of love?”

    Ironically the call to follow your bliss often comes when the needs of the body and soul may no longer be met by our career, society, our relationships, or our pleasures.  When the best laid plans go awry or we may be faced with ill health. It may be here, as Campbell says “You must give up the life you planned in order to have the life that is waiting for you.”

    This course will offer us a chance to examine paths to discover our own unique field of bliss. We will consider how to take on this quest consciously and intentionally. In this way we can discover the energy in our “innermost being” that will illuminate our bliss and avoid enslavement. This may be done by reclaiming and integrating the energy invested in repressing our shadows both dark and golden that have guarded the treasure of bliss.  Once our bliss begins to be revealed “our life experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonances with our own innermost being and reality” and the doors to support our path to bliss in the outer world can open. 

    Tim Lyons, LICSW, is a Jungian-oriented psychotherapist in private practice in Capitol Hill and Takoma Park, Maryland.  He is a frequent course presenter at the Jung Society of Washington and has studied Tibetan Buddhism, Taoism, and yoga for many years.  He is also an architect, has written for the Washington Post, and has lectured at the Smithsonian Institution.


    • Monday, March 19, 2018
    • Monday, May 14, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
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    Book Exploration Course
    We will read and discuss the following five novels:  The End of the Affair by Graham Greene; Lying Awake by Mark Salzman; The Painted Veil by Somerset Maugham; Abide with Me by Elizabeth Strout, and The Second Coming by Walker Percy. 

    Julie Bondanza, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and a diplomate Jungian analyst who trained at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she was Director of Training, a job she also held with the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts. She has taught extensively in New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Washington, as well as for various Jung societies across the country. Presently she serves the board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York and continues to serve as its program chair, a post she has held for many years. Dr. Bondanza practices in Takoma Park and lives in Washington, D.C.

    • Friday, March 23, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 13
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    An Evening with...

    Bearskin is a fairy tale about a good soldier who served his country well.  So long as there was war, he was successful—the best of any in the art and craft of war making. When the war ended, however, he was discharged with nothing but his gun.  He was unprepared for civilian life, for fighting wars was all he knew.  Then his hard-bitten brothers refused to help him out. “You are of no use to use,” they said.  “Go and make a living for yourself.”

    Abandoned, alone, and left with nothing but dark shadows from the war, our hero found himself in a circle of trees within a laid-waste land. There he sat down to contemplate how he should die. Those of you who are familiar with fairy tales will suspect that our soldier is in crisis.  And, just at the moment when the hero or heroine is destitute and out of options, the time is ripe for something marvelous to appear.  The opportunity for a life-changing adventure, or test, is in the making, an intervention from the magical realm, or in our language, from the creative unconscious.  Indeed, this is the case for our destitute soldier.  He hears a rustling noise from behind, and now a strange man stood where there had been no man before. Strange indeed, for this “stately” man wears a green coat and has a cloven foot.  Again, as you already suspect, this stately green-coated, cloven-footed man has a proposal for our hero.  One that will bring him grace, salvation, and prosperity, or sure death – death of soul and body.

    The test will involve living for seven years inside two coats, a bearskin, and the mysterious man’s green coat, without washing, cutting his hair, trimming his nails, or any personal grooming at all.  Yikes!  Could you stand yourself, living inside your own shadow stuff, for seven years?                                                                                             

    What is this story about? Tonight I will lead us thought the story of Bearskin.  We will spend time looking at how the story starts – the story’s threshold, and its initial conditions.  We will share our associations with the archetypal patterns present from the start, and speculate as to where we see these patterns operating in today’s world.  For example, you will probably associate Bearskin, a story that comes to us out of the Ages of Stone, with many stories of our military personnel and veterans today.  Yet, many times we suffer moments in life when we are, washed up, destitute spiritually or otherwise, and have received help from unknown sources.  Our fairy tale has much to teach us about such moments and such marvels.

    Bonnie L. Damron, Ph.D., L.C.S.W., is a Jungian-Oriented psychotherapist in private practice in Northern Virginia. Bonnie is a clinician, cultural anthropologist, artist, and storyteller. She teaches courses in mythology, fairy tales, Shakespeare, the Greek Classics, and readings in the writings of C. G. Jung. She also leads contemplative retreats, and conducts study tours in Crete. She holds a Masters of Social Work from Catholic University, a Doctorate Degree in American Studies from the University of Maryland, and has completed the Two-Year Pattern Analyst Certificate Program at the Assisi Institute in Brattleboro, Vermont.

    • Saturday, March 24, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 13
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    A Day with...

    Bearskin: A Story about the Value and Meaning of Purgatory as a Place of Healing and Rebirth

    Bearskin is a very old story and as recent as today’s news.  It is about a good soldier, one who knows the art and craft of war making.  When the war ended, however, he is discharged.  His only provision is his gun.  He is ill prepared for civilian life; fighting wars was all he knew.  His hard-bitten brothers refused to help him out. “You are of no use to us,” they said.  “Go and make a living for yourself.”  Wandering about in a state of collapse and exhaustion, with no companions except the dark shadows from the war, he wanders into a circle of trees within a laid-waste land.  His only thoughts are those of his own death.  Clearly, this man is in crisis.  He teeters on the brink of chaos, even suicide.             

    Often, As is the case with our hero, in the hour of our greatest need, when we are depleted, and hope wanes, the god comes – a paraclete, a divine helper, appears.  For Odysseus, the paraclete is the goddess Athene, for Psyche it is the god Pan, for Faust it is Mephistopheles, in St. John’s Gospel it is the Holy Spirit, and for our soldier it is a stately cloven-footed man wearing a green coat.                                                     

    The cloven-footed, green-coated man makes our hero an offer of redemption from his current circumstances.  The soldier, suspecting that his paraclete is none other than the devil himself, declares he will agree, but not at the price of his salvation.  The man’s answer –“You will look to that for yourself.”  The proposition involves wearing the skin from a bear, which the soldier is just about to kill, and the green coat belonging to this stately stranger.  Any time the soldier is in need of money, he will find it in the pocket of the green coat.  However, the soldier must wear these coats for a period of seven years, and during that time he is not to bathe or do any grooming at all.  If, after seven years, the soldier, our hero, succeeds in keeping his side of the bargain, he is to meet the cloven-footed man here at this same circle of trees, and his future will be secure.                               

    Purgatory is an archetypally formed experience structured to create the necessary and sufficient conditions for cleansing, healing and rebirth.  One way to translate the circumstances set forth by the stranger, the god of this story, for our hero is this.  The god, the soldier’s divine helper, creates the necessary and sufficient conditions for redemption for our hero in his own unique form of purgatory.  By living inside this double-coated garment for a period of seven years where the gold resides, he establishes a place of deep introversion and incubation.  In other words, the soldier, our hero, is literally in purgatory, a place for deep cleansing of soul and body.  This process provides a time to slough off negative complexes, the shadow aspects of war, and negative effects of war living in the psyche of our hero.

    During our seminar we will move slowly through Bearskin, and amplify the images as we go along.  We will describe the value and meaning of purgatorial rites and rituals, and see how this fairy tale follows the pattern of cleansing, healing and rebirth well known to ancient and indigenous societies.  Such rites of passage were practiced in the temples of the Greek gods of healing, Asklipios and Hygenieia; during the ancient Great Mother Mysteries, practiced in the sacred cave on Ida Mountain in central Crete; in shamanic based cultures, such as those described by Black Elk, Oglala Lakota holy man of the 20th Century; St. Patrick’s purgatory of ancient Ireland; and, when the conditions are right, in the practice of psychotherapy today.

    There is so much wisdom in the old stories, the ones that begin, “Once upon a time,” stories that come to us from the Ages of Stone.  Bearskin is one such story.  What wisdom does it offer us for ourselves as individuals and for the world we find ourselves in today?

    Bonnie Damron  is a psychotherapist, ethnographer, storyteller, and Archetypal Pattern Analyst in private practice in the Washington, D. C. metropolitan area.  During her thirty-four years in practice, she has conducted seminars on archetypal motifs in fairy tales, myths, the arts, and the writings of C. G. Jung.  She also leads study tours to Crete and the Greek mainland.  Dr. Damron holds a Masters of Social Work degree from Catholic University, a Doctoral Degree in American Culture Studies from the University of Maryland, and a Certificate as an Archetypal Pattern Analyst from the Assisi Institute for Archetypal Studies.
    • Saturday, March 24, 2018
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 22
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    Discussion Group

    On March 24th, Janet Kane will deliver her annual look at the planetary aspects this year and how they will affect the United States and our personal lives.

    The year 2018 will be quite a busy year astrologically with Mars, the planet of war, and Venus, the planet of love, turning retrograde.  Three major outer planets will change signs this year.  Jupiter, the greater benefic, will leave Scorpio and enter Sagittarius the sign it rules.  Saturn, the reality principle has just entered Capricorn the sign it rules. These two planets are powerful in these signs.  Uranus, the planet of change, will leave Aries and enter Taurus this year where it will be in a cooperative aspect to Pluto, the Lord of Transformation. With the two of them working together, they could bring in positive change on a global scale.

    All of these outer planets will be in much greater harmony with each other than they have been in years.  We will all have an opportunity to make beneficial transformations.

    Janet Kane is a professional consulting astrologer who uses archetypes found in literature, myths, fairy tales, and film in her consultations, courses, and workshops. She has taught at Mount Vernon College, The Jung Society of Washington, The Friends Wellspring Conference, and Washington College in Chestertown, MD. She is also the founder of the Wisewoman Forum in Washington, D.C. She publishes a free, on-line newsletter, Mythic Zodiac. You can sign up for her newsletter via her blog at http://www.mythiczodiac.com  or contact her at janetkane56@gmail.com

     Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.
    • Friday, April 06, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Sanctuary of the Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 64
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    Lecture 

    "Normal development involves to a large extent the surrender of creativity in favor of a recognition of generally accepted cultural values and the sacrifice of individuality to an adjustment to the requirements of the collective...yet the survival and the creative endurance of this sacrifice provides the indispensable basis for the individuation process of the second half of life, which is world embracing in the true sense of the world..."
    - Erich Neumann, Creative Man p. 212 

    When entering the autumn and winter of life, we often experience a profound lack of orientation. So many of our meaningful accomplishments from the first half of life now begin to lose their luster, and those aspirations and dreams that had set our hearts on fire are now eclipsed by these new and strange emotions and desires, which are suddenly emerging from the shadows. 

    The needs and emotions of this autumn and winter of life speaks to us in a foreign tongue. The fires and passions of youth and the middle years are now reduced to smoldering embers, and with these, the hunger for so much of what we wanted in life quickly fades into the domain of memory. These embers no longer warm our heart and soul. The only truly accurate rendering and intimations of this life now calling us is found in our dreams, our frustrations, symptoms, and those cravings for what Rabbi Heschel calls “the ineffable.”

    And then there is the role of psyche and soul in this aging process, wherein the voice and needs of the Self now speak louder than the youthful chorus still clamoring for  an outdated way of life. In Hemingway’s last major work of fiction, The Old Man and the Sea, we find this dialogue between ego and Self, and those yearnings of our younger self confronting the reality of who we are now as an older person. Through the old man’s journey and reluctant recognition that he now must view his life against the backdrop of a life vastly different from what it once was, he now has to make a number of crucial and life threatening decisions. And it is this old man's refusal to respond to the call of the ineffable, and the consequences of his actions, that actually teaches us a profound lesson about the aging process.  

    Standing face to face with the reality that we have aged and now face certain limitations, and also, opportunities we never imagined, we are challenged to hear those painful lamentations of ego and youth as we move into this later and eventually final stage of life. Now it is imperative to know what it is that we so deeply love and cherish, need to preserve, and then recognize those aspects of life that we need to relinquish, as they no longer satisfy the mandates of the Self. 

    Perhaps here we will see how those roaring fires of our earlier years are transformed by the richly grained oak and maple woods whose warmth provides us with a sustained heat. Perhaps now this new perspective of life's journey, and where we are on this road, allows us to finally take that winter house rental overlooking the Aeolian sea.

    * I want to thank Loralee Conforti for this Neumann reference

    Michael Conforti, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and founder of the Assisi Institute. He has been a faculty member at the C. G. Jung Institute in Boston, the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York, and for many years a Senior Associate faculty member in the Doctoral and Master’s Programs in Clinical Psychology at Antioch New England.  A pioneer in the field of matter-psyche studies, Dr. Conforti is actively investigating the workings of archetypal fields and the relationship between Jungian psychology and the New Sciences. He is the author of two books, Threshold Experiences: The Archetype of Beginnings and Field, Form, and Fate: Patterns in Mind, Nature, and Psyche.  He is currently working on a new book,  Hidden Presence: Archetypes, Spells,  Possessions, and the Complex.  Dr. Conforti maintains a private practice in Mystic, CT, and consults with individuals and corporations around the world. 

    • Saturday, April 07, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, N.W., Washington D.C. 20016
    • 14
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    A Day with...

    In these later stages of life we are faced with a reality so foreign  and disturbing that we often turn our back on it,  retreating to the life we have lived and known for so long. However,  Psyche's voice will not be silenced at this profound moment in life, when we are asked to not only face our  mortality, but  the destiny  often  unacknowledged, yet still waiting in -potentia for us. Now we have arrived at that threshold where we either accept  the destiny that is ours, or  reject it, causing us to linger in a barren wasteland, where we are no longer young, or accepting the stage we  have arrived at. 

    In this seminar we will seek to understand the Self's mandates in the aging process by looking at a series of dreams. These will help us to discern the  workings  of outdated youthful complexes, as well as learning to recognize and understand those messages from The Self calling us to a  new life.   We will also delve into Hemingway's novel, The Old Man and the Sea, to  understand  the challenges of  moving beyond  outdated attitudes and  the consequences of  not responding to what is being asked us. 

    Michael Conforti, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and founder of the Assisi Institute.   He has been a faculty member at the C. G. Jung Institute in Boston, the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York, and for many years a Senior Associate faculty member in the Doctoral and Master’s Programs in Clinical Psychology at Antioch New England.  A pioneer in the field of matter-psyche studies, Dr. Conforti is actively investigating the workings of archetypal fields and the relationship between Jungian psychology and the New Sciences.  He is the author of two books, Threshold Experiences: The Archetype of Beginnings and Field, Form, and Fate: Patterns in Mind, Nature, and Psyche.  He is currently working on a new book,  Hidden Presence: Archetypes, Spells,  Possessions, and the Complex.  Dr. Conforti maintains a private practice in Mystic, CT, and consults with individuals and corporations around the world. 

    • Wednesday, April 18, 2018
    • Wednesday, May 30, 2018
    • 6 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 14
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    Course

    “It may be said that round the material contained in this volume the major portion of his later work revolves” (ed. note, first edition).

    Jung spent the last third of his life studying and writing about alchemy.  Volume 12 of his Collected Works, Psychology and Alchemy, is one of his most influential works.   This book serves as C.G. Jung’s introduction of alchemy to his readers and illustrates that, from the beginning, alchemy had a dual nature: chemical work on one hand and a psychological process on the other.

    This course will cover Part I, “Introduction to the Religious and Psychological Problems of Alchemy,” and Part III, “Religious Ideas in Alchemy,” chapters 1-4.  Part I is a study of the relationship between alchemy and the psychic process of individuation.  Part III is a survey of the basic concepts of alchemy, including the alchemical process and its stages, the conceptions and symbols of the goal, the nature of the prima materia and the hidden treasure within this dark matter.  Additionally, the work of redemption is viewed from the perspectives of both the Christian Church and that of alchemy; the symbolism and language of the Mass is discussed.

    The format of this course is class discussion based on the readings.  For the first class, please read Part 1, “Introduction to the Religious and Psychological Problems of Alchemy,” (pp. 1-37).

    Cathryn Polonchak is a certified Jungian Analyst and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of West Virginia.  She has a private practice in the Shepherdstown and the Charles Town/Harpers Ferry areas of West Virginia.  In addition to her membership in JAWA, Cathryn is a member of the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts (PAJA), the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts (IRSJA), the International Association of Analytical Psychology (IAAP), and the National Association of social Workers (NASW).  She was the past Director of Seminar for PAJA.  She is interested in the interface between body and mind, particularly at the psyche-soma level of trauma.

    • Friday, April 20, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 14
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    An Evening with...

    Everything ends.  Everyone encounters loss.  But have you ever experienced a devastating loss that actually opened a door to a new life that you would not have had without it?  Endings can be painful, but they can also herald the beginning of a new chapter in our lives, a chapter that we might not have begun if the dreaded end had not come, the endings in our lives that have made way for never-realized awareness and opportunities for a revitalized existence.  As individuals we have all encountered such losses and have also been able to make changes that put us on a new path on this journey we call life.  Jimmy will share his own personal recovery story and his need to confront the shadow in the quest for “self.”

    James Fox is a Transformational Coach Practitioner and the inspirational and motivational founder of Momentive™LLC, an executive coaching and training business in Washington, D.C.

    • Saturday, April 21, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 0
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    A Day with...

    David Whyte's book describes how poetry awakens the imagination and opens our eyes. In a small group we will explore his poetry, reflecting upon how poetry in general and his poems, in particular, can touch and inform our lives.

    “Each of us,” Whyte writes, “lives at a very private, personal frontier between what rises astonishingly from within and what seems to overwhelm us from without; every day being a threshold opportunity from a not fully known and just about to be articulated edge of what we call a self.” “Poetry,” he suggests, “is an invitation to overhear yourself say things you didn’t know you knew that can emancipate you from a smaller self into a larger possibility.”

    David Whyte grew up among the hills  and valleys of Yorkshire, England. He holds a degree in marine zoology and has served as a naturalist guide leading anthropological and natural history expeditions in the Galapagos Islands as well as the Andes, Amazon and Himalayas. He now lives in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S.

    His books include “The Heart Aroused: Poetry & the Preservation of the Soul in Corporate America” (1994); “River Flow: New and Selected Poems 1984-2007” (2006), “Everything Is Waiting for You” (2003), and “Songs for Coming Home (1984).”

    Bill Dols has served parishes in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina as an Episcopal priest for twenty-five years. While pursuing graduate studies in psychology and biblical studies in Berkeley in the 1980s, he began leading seminars for The Guild For Psychological Studies in San Francisco. After eight years as Director of The Educational Center in St. Louis, he moved to Charlotte where, until his retirement in 2001, he served as Minister of Adult Education at The Myers Park Baptist Church. Bill and Shirley now live in Alexandria, where they tutor public-school first graders, quilt and garden, paint and read. Bill continues to contribute to The Bible Workbench, which he created and edited for twenty years, and on occasion, he leads weekend retreats.
    • Saturday, April 28, 2018
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 22
    Register

    Discussion Group

    The Magdalene Mysteries relate both to ‘hidden’ histories and Gnostic Texts concerning Mary Magdalene and Jesus, and to the Tradition of the Blue Rose, the name given to MM’s teachings, and a lineage of Grail Priestesses and Womb Shamans whose central symbol is the Chalice of the Grail, and whose guiding force is the Cosmic Sophia.  MM has a strong presence throughout France, particularly in Provence, and in the Languedoc where the Cathar Gnostic Movement – devotees of MM and Jesus – also flourished.  

    On April 28th, Marie Saeger and Robin Rausch will talk about their experiences on a pilgrimage last fall to the Languedoc, France and Catalonia, Spain where they visited some of the sites sacred to these traditions. 

    Marie Saeger is among the earliest participants in the Wisewoman group.  Marie is from Toledo, Ohio and has lived in Germany, Spain, and Paraguay.  She has also traveled in Europe, the Middle East, South America, and Asia.  She has worked as a teacher, travel agent, Red Cross case worker, Peace Corps volunteer, and computer programmer analyst.  She is retired and lives in Silver Spring, MD.

    Robin Rausch is also among the Wisewoman group’s earliest members.  Her interest in things Jungian dates from a class in religious myth and symbolism that she took in undergraduate school.  She holds degrees in music and library science and is currently the head of Reader Services in the Music Division at the Library of Congress.

    Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.
    • Tuesday, May 01, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 9
    Register

    Film Night: PSYCHOLOGY AND RELIGION, Jung's Argument with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Thursday, May 03, 2018
    • Thursday, May 31, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 2
    Register
    Course

    We will revisit the first stories we remember hearing. Where did we hear them? Were they read to us or did we read them ourselves? What were they about?

    In this class for 10-12 people we will use pastels, tissue paper collage, clay and journaling to explore the meaning of story. How does exposure to early stories influence our development?  Where do they show up later in life, sometimes as life scripts or personal myths and fairytales?

    This workshop will be playful, creative and personally informative. Participants will come to see how their unique versions of even classic stories

    become sign posts on their journey of individuation. In the process we will witness each other and be witnessed in a safe space. The place Jung described as the temenos.

    Join me, Sandy Geller, with your stories in the month of May 2018.

    Sondra Geller, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, is a Jungian Analyst, Board Certified Registered Art Therapist, and Licensed Professional Counselor.  She has a private practice in Washington, D.C., where she sees clients individually and in groups. Her work reflects a synthesis of the principals of both Jungian Analytic Psychology and Art Therapy.  Sandy also teaches and presents experiential workshops focusing on the dynamics of making art in the presence of the analyst.  What happens in the silent space between client/artist and Jungian analyst/observer, and how does this dynamic facilitate the journey of individuation? 
    • Friday, May 04, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Sanctuary of the Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 64
    Register

    Lecture 

    The attainment of wholeness requires one to stake one’s whole being.  Nothing less will do. 
    - C.G. Jung

    How has the concept of wholeness been perceived throughout the centuries?  How did Jung answer the longing for wholeness?  How do we answer?  With excerpts from Jung’s The Red Book: Liber Novus and Memories, Dreams, Reflections, along with excerpts from Thomas Merton, Annie Dillard, and Orhan Pamuk, we will consider different ways to wholeness, from journaling and active imagination to the quiet practice of Zen.  In bringing the pieces together – within ourselves and within the world around us ­– we will uncover our essential oneness. 

    Susan Tiberghien, an American writer living in Geneva, Switzerland, has published three memoirs: Looking for Gold, Circling to the Center, Footsteps-A European Album, and the highly appreciated writing book,  One Year to a Writing Life, plus two new titles published in 2015: Side by Side: Writing Your Love Story and Footsteps:  In Love with a Frenchman.  She has been teaching writing workshops for close to twenty years at C.G. Jung Centers, at the International Women’s Writing Guild, and at writers’ centers and conferences in the States and in Europe where she directs the Geneva Writers’ Group, an association of 250 English-language writers.
    Find her at www.susantiberghien.com

    • Saturday, May 05, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, N.W., Washington D.C. 20016
    • 15
    Register

    A Day with...

    The attainment of wholeness requires one to stake one’s whole being.  Nothing less will do.  -C.G. Jung

    How has the concept of wholeness been perceived throughout the centuries?  How did Jung answer the longing for wholeness?  How do we answer?  With excerpts from Jung’s The Red Book: Liber Novus and Memories, Dreams, Reflections, along with excerpts from Thomas Merton, Annie Dillard, and Orhan Pamuk, we will consider different ways to wholeness, from journaling and active imagination to the quiet practice of Zen.  In bringing the pieces together – within ourselves and within the world around us ­– we will uncover our essential oneness. 

    Susan Tiberghien, an American writer living in Geneva, Switzerland, has published three memoirs: Looking for Gold, Circling to the Center, Footsteps-A European Album, and the highly appreciated writing book,  One Year to a Writing Life, plus two new titles published in 2015: Side by Side: Writing Your Love Story and Footsteps:  In Love with a Frenchman.  She has been teaching writing workshops for close to twenty years at C.G. Jung Centers, at the International Women’s Writing Guild, and at writers’ centers and conferences in the States and in Europe where she directs the Geneva Writers’ Group, an association of 250 English-language writers.
    Find her at www.susantiberghien.com

     

    • Tuesday, May 08, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 9
    Register

    Film Night: JUNG ON CHRISTIANITY, with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.


    • Friday, May 11, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 12
    Register

    An Evening with...

    Description to follow.

    Carolyn Brown, bio to follow.


    • Tuesday, May 15, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 8
    Register

    Film Night: JUNG ON EASTERN RELIGIONS, with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Saturday, May 19, 2018
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 22
    Register

    Discussion Group

    On May 19th, Dianne Mouchon Rhodes, will lead a presentation on hypnosis. She will begin with an introductory talk about hypnosis in general and how Carl Jung used hypnosis.  Then she will lead a guided hypnotic visualization centered on women’s self-empowerment and self-love and connecting to our inner spiritual guidance.  Dianne’s presentation will be followed by a Q&A Discussion. 

    Dianne Mouchon Rhodes is a Certified Consulting Hypnosis Therapist and Projective Dreamworker. Dianne has been helping people to create positive behavior changes with the use of hypnosis therapy for four years. Certified through Jeremy Taylor’s MIPD Certificate Program, Dianne also facilitates dream groups and experiential dreamwork workshops and offers individual dream interpretation.  You can find out more about Dianne and her services at www.dreamyourinnerhorizons.com.  

    Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.

    • Saturday, May 19, 2018
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 23
    Register

    Discussion Group

    On May 19th, Dianne Mouchon Rhodes, will lead a presentation on hypnosis. She will begin with an introductory talk about hypnosis in general and how Carl Jung used hypnosis.  Then she will lead a guided hypnotic visualization centered on women’s self-empowerment and self-love and connecting to our inner spiritual guidance.  Dianne’s presentation will be followed by a Q&A Discussion. 

    Dianne Mouchon Rhodes is a Certified Consulting Hypnosis Therapist and Projective Dreamworker. Dianne has been helping people to create positive behavior changes with the use of hypnosis therapy for four years. Certified through Jeremy Taylor’s MIPD Certificate Program, Dianne also facilitates dream groups and experiential dreamwork workshops and offers individual dream interpretation.  You can find out more about Dianne and her services at www.dreamyourinnerhorizons.com.  

    Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.


    • Tuesday, May 22, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 8
    Register

    Film Night:  JUNG ON THE JEWISH MYSTICAL TRADITION with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.


    • Tuesday, May 29, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 10
    Register

    Film Night: JUNG ON THE BIBLE: THE ANSWER TO JOB with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Friday, June 01, 2018
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016


    To join a waitlist for the 2018-19 academic year of the Jungian Studies Reading Seminar, please email James Hollis at Archaeon@AOL.com 
    Put into your email subject line:
    Jungian Studies 2018-19, Your Full Name
    Applications will be accepted starting June 1, 2018
    Registration will be upon acceptance to the program.

    The Jung Society of Washington Jungian Studies Reading Seminar includes eight monthly seminars offered per year to read and discuss predominantly classical Jung and other figures who link directly to the classical Jungian corpus.

    The Fall/Spring semesters of 2017-18, Jungian analysts are teaching celebrated works by Erich Neumann, James Hillman, Marie-Louise von Franz, Emma Jung, Edward Edinger, and Marian Woodman.

    While some of the prior members of the Jung Studies Reading Seminar will be continuing with the program in 2018-19, the Jung Society will open up participation to new members for the next academic year program.

    Participation is open to anyone, regardless of background, who wishes to learn the theory and practice of depth psychology from some of its great teachers.

    The seminar meets one Saturday per month from 9 to 4:30 during the months September through December and February through May. The participant is obliged only to read the texts and come prepared for discussion conducted by the analyst. 

    Anyone interested in applying should direct their questions or applications to James Hollis at Archaeon@AOL.com.

    This year the program is graciously underwritten in part by the Prometheus Foundation

    Tuition $800 per semester, $1600 per year. 

    At the end of the two year cycle, a certificate of completion will be conferred.


    • Friday, June 01, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Butler Boardroom, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register

    Lecture

    For the last 30 years, I have been writing about a sophisticated inner system of archetypal defenses (known as the “self-care system”), which forms what I believe to be a core complex of the traumatized psyche (see Blake Painting of ‘The Good and Evil Angels Fighting for Possession of a Child’).  The purpose of this inner structure (witnessed in both mythology and dreams) seems to be to dissociate, protect, and defend a sacred, innocent core of en-souled selfhood from further violation by experience. Unfortunately, such protection is obtained at a very high cost, because by protecting and sequestering the lost heart of the self, the dissociative defenses also cut it off from conscious feeling and hence from life.  Psychotherapy, therefore, often becomes a battle between life- and anti-life forces on behalf of the soul.

    In this slide-illustrated lecture, Dr. Kalsched will present both ancient and contemporary imagery of this core complex and its role in both protecting and persecuting the orphaned soul of the trauma survivor. Clinical vignettes will illustrate the process through which the lost soul is contacted and invited into relationship.

    Donald E. Kalsched, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and clinical psychologist with a private practice in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  He is a member of the C.G. Jung Institute of Santa Fe, a senior faculty member and supervisor with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts, and lectures nationally and internationally pursuing his inter-disciplinary interest in early trauma and dissociation.  He is the author of numerous articles and two major books, The Inner World of Trauma: Archetypal Defenses of the Personal Spirit, (Routledge, 1996) and his recent Trauma and the Soul: A Psycho-spiritual Approach to Human Development and its Interruption (Routledge, 2013).  His latest book explores how psychotherapeutic work with trauma survivors sometimes provides unexpected access to an ineffable world of soul and spirit.

    Directions to the Butler Boardroom at the American University here.


    • Saturday, June 02, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • The Butler Boardroom, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register

    Workshop

    According to C.G. Jung, the human personality contains a vital spark or sacred core of aliveness (soul) that must personalize and embody in the course of a person’s development if optimal psychological health and ensouled living is to become possible.  But when trauma strikes the developing psyche of a child, a dissociation or split occurs in which the vital core of the self (often represented as a ‘child’) retreats into the unconscious where it continues to live in “suspended animation” under a spell cast by the powers of the psyche’s survival system.  Depth Psychotherapy offers the opportunity for renewed contact with this orphaned child and hence for renewed feeling-life, creativity, and relatedness—but not without fierce resistance thrown up by the psyche’s defensive powers.

    In this slide-illustrated lecture and workshop, we will explore this archetypal struggle with the help of clinical examples, dreams, and mythological amplifications.  New findings in attachment theory, affective neuroscience and somatically attuned ways of working in the psychotherapy process, will be discussed.

    Donald E. Kalsched, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and clinical psychologist with a private practice in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  He is a member of the C.G. Jung Institute of Santa Fe, a senior faculty member and supervisor with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts, and lectures nationally and internationally pursuing his inter-disciplinary interest in early trauma and dissociation.  He is the author of numerous articles and two major books, The Inner World of Trauma: Archetypal Defenses of the Personal Spirit, (Routledge, 1996) and his recent Trauma and the Soul: A Psycho-spiritual Approach to Human Development and its Interruption (Routledge, 2013).  His latest book explores how psychotherapeutic work with trauma survivors sometimes provides unexpected access to an ineffable world of soul and spirit.

    Directions to the Butler Boardroom at the American University here.


Please read before you register

The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit educational institution. Although many of the Jung Society's programs involve analytical psychology and allied subjects, these offerings are intended, and should be viewed, as a source of information and education, and not as therapy. The Jung Society does not offer psychoanalytical or other mental health services.

Cancellation Policy: Registration for Jung Society of Washington events may be canceled with a full refund until one week before the event's date. Thereafter, refunds are not available.

Please refrain from wearing intense perfumes and other fragrances when you attend our programs as some people may be sensitive to them. We thank you in advance.

OUR MISSION
The Jung Society of Washington brings the general public and professional community the insights and tools of analytic psychology and related disciplines. Through programs, classes, visiting speakers, partnerships with like organizations, and digital media, the Jung Society creates a platform for communal discussion regarding the personal and cultural issues that confront us. The tools these programs provide assist individuals, relationships, and societies in a dialogue that enhances understanding the unconscious dynamics that course through personal lives, cultural problems, and historic patterns.

JUNG SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON
5200 Cathedral Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20016
CALL: 202-237-8109
EMAIL: jungsociety@jung.org

OFFICE & LIBRARY HOURS:
Weekdays: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

DIRECTIONS
BY CAR: From MacArthur Blvd., turn east (away from the Potomac River) onto Cathedral at the light between Loughboro and Arizona.

BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT: D6 bus line.
Parking is available in the streets.
Entrance to the Jung Society library and office is from the side street, Hawthorne Place.


The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit educational institution. Although many of the Jung Society's programs involve analytical psychology and allied subjects, these offerings are intended, and should be viewed, as a source of information and education, and not as therapy. The Jung Society does not offer psychoanalytical or other mental health services.
Images of mandalas throughout this site were created by Carl Jung's patients between the years 1926 and 1945.

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