a container for the psyche in an uncertain world

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Programs

"I'm always excited by the materials the Faculty of the Jung Society chooses for the programs whether it's poetry, literature, drama, philosophy, meditation, or expressive arts."

- Jung Society Program Participant

    • Monday, September 18, 2017
    • Monday, November 13, 2017
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register
    Book Exploration Course

    Each of these books has psychotherapy at its center.  We’ll begin with the first two books of the Deptford trilogy by Robertson Davies, and in subsequent weeks, we’ll read the play Equus by Peter Shaffer, the novel Trauma by Patrick McGrath, followed by a Shining Affliction by Annie Rogers, and finally, the World is Made of Glass by Morris West.

    Julie Bondanza, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and a diplomate Jungian analyst who trained at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she was Director of Training, a job she also held with the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts. She has taught extensively in New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Washington, as well as for various Jung societies across the country. Presently she serves the board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York and continues to serve as its program chair, a post she has held for many years. Dr. Bondanza practices in Takoma Park and lives in Washington, D.C.

    • Tuesday, October 10, 2017
    • Tuesday, November 07, 2017
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
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    Course

    It is said that we are now living in extraordinary times. How are you coping? What are your thoughts, feelings, and experiences? Please join me in a discussion of Erich Neumann’s Depth Psychology and a New Ethic, published in German in 1949, and certainly relevant today.

    Neumann was born in Berlin in 1905 and died in Tel Aviv in 1960. He met Jung in 1933 at a seminar that Jung was conducting in Berlin.  Searching for a tzadik (a spiritual guide), Neumann entered analysis with Jung for six months in 1933 before he emigrated to Tel Aviv.  The two men corresponded until Neumann’s death.  His other works include The Origins and History of Consciousness (1954), The Great Mother (1955), and Amor and Psyche (1956).

    "Erich Neumann’s book Depth Psychology and New Ethic (1949) was and remains a disturbing and revolutionary book. Having appreciated the discovery of psychodynamic psychology, Neumann challenges the received tradition of transmitted ethical authority with the “authority” of the soul.  What happens when these two are in conflict?  How does one choose?  How does one solicit a dialogue with the psyche and work one’s way through to an ethically nuanced conviction supported by one’s own depth? From Antigone through Kierkegaard, MLK, and Gandhi, up to the present hour, these timeless questions challenge each of us to consider the basis of our choices more holistically."

    - James Hollis, Pd.D.

    Phyllis LaPlante is a certified Jungian Analyst and Licensed Clinical Social Worker. She received her Diploma from the C.G. Jung Institute of New York in 1998. She teaches courses in Jungian theory and practice in Washington and is a member of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts. Semi-retired, she offers short-term consultation.

    • Saturday, October 21, 2017
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 19
    Register

    Discussion Group

    We will discuss what was the best time of our lives and what was the worst.  Everyone’s input is welcome.  These and other questions are what Barbara Walters asked celebrities on her final television interview show in 2014, at age 84.     

    Beverly Fourier was born in Adams, Massachusetts, the birthplace of U.S. suffragette Susan B. Anthony.  Beverly has an undergraduate degree in languages from Boston University, a graduate degree in Education from Stanford University and a degree from George Washington University in Human Development.  Beverly spent many years overseas.  She lived in Warsaw, Poland, Tehran, Iran, and Moscow, USSR, as a U.S. Foreign Service spouse.  Beverly Fourier has been a member of the Wisewoman Group since October 2001.  She has held talks on the ancient goddesses of the Middle East, Old Europe, African goddesses, and also on a new archetype she calls the Fierce Venus that is currently undergoing a backlash. 

     Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.
    • Wednesday, October 25, 2017
    • Wednesday, December 06, 2017
    • 6 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
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    Course

    "I had very soon seen that analytical psychology coincided in a most curious way with alchemy.  The experiences of the alchemist were, in a sense, my experiences, and their world was my world.  This was, of course, a momentous discovery: I had stumbled upon the counterpart of my psychology of the unconscious."
    - C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, and Reflections, p. 20

    "[T]he entire alchemical procedure . . . could just as well represent the individuation process of a single individual . . ."
    - C.G. Jung, Mysterium Coniunctionis, CW 14, par. 792

    Alchemy occupied a significant place in Jung’s life and work during his last thirty years.  Three volumes of his Collected Works (CW 12, Psychology and Alchemy; CW 13, Alchemical Studies; and CW 14, Mysterium Coniunctionis) make up a considerable part of Jung’s alchemical writings.  For Jung, the imagery and metaphors of alchemy derived from the collective unconscious and provided an archetypal basis for his own psychology.  This alchemical imagery survives today in the individual soul and provides us with an objective basis from which to approach unconscious material such as dreams and fantasies.  

    The dark, complex, image-dense alchemical material creates a challenge for even the most astute student of alchemy.  Jung put aside the first alchemical book he purchased for almost two years, perceiving it as “blatant nonsense” before deciding to go through it thoroughly.  Jung’s own alchemical writings are challenging due to his tangential style of writing that alludes to relevant imagery and systems of thought (mythology, philosophy, theology).  Today, for those of us who want to delve into alchemy, we have the benefit of the writings of two close followers of Jung, Marie-Louise von Franz and Edward Edinger, each with a stated goal to help the reader more easily grasp the difficult and challenging aspects of Jung’s alchemical writings.

    This course serves as an introduction to alchemy as it relates to Jungian psychology.  We will use two texts:  Alchemy: An Introduction to the Symbolism and the Psychology by Marie-Louise von Franz and Anatomy of the Psyche:  Alchemical Symbolism in Psychotherapy by Edward Edinger.  Each author was a close disciple of Jung and viewed Jung’s alchemical works to be fundamental to his overall psychology.   We’ll begin with the von Franz, reading for the first class Lectures 1-4, pp. 13 - 123

    Cathryn Polonchak is a certified Jungian Analyst and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of West Virginia.  She has a private practice in the Shepherdstown and the Charles Town/Harpers Ferry areas of West Virginia.  In addition to her membership in JAWA, Cathryn is a member of the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts (PAJA), the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts (IRSJA), the International Association of Analytical Psychology (IAAP), and the National Association of social Workers (NASW).  She was the past Director of Seminar for PAJA.  She is interested in the interface between body and mind, particularly at the psyche-soma level of trauma.

    • Thursday, October 26, 2017
    • Thursday, November 30, 2017
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 2
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    Course

    This class will explore Jung’s concept of the symbolic attitude of the psyche.  We will identify symbols of the Self and interface with them using basic art materials, such as pastels, clay, water color, wire sculpture, writing, and gesture.  Exploring both personal and archetypal symbolism will expand our self-understanding and bring us into relationship with the numinous.

    The dynamics of working together as a group will offer an experience of the healing effect of being witnessed and in turn, witnessing.  All of this will happen within the framework of a secure symbolizing space, the Jungian temenos.  No previous experience with the expressive arts is necessary.  You will be asked to keep a journal during the six weeks of the class to record your experiences of becoming familiar with your Self symbols.  Details to follow upon registration.
    Sondra Geller, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, has a master’s degree in Art Therapy from The George Washington University. She received her Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts. She is a Jungian Analyst, a Licensed Professional Counselor and a Board Certified Registered Art Therapist. She is a member of JAWA, AATA, IRSJA, IAAP, and PAJA. She is in private practice in Chevy Chase, Md. She lectures and gives workshops for The George Washington University Art Therapy Master's Program, Philadelphia Jung Institute/PAJA, the Jung Society of Washington and the C.G. Jung Institute in Kusnacht, Switzerland. Her focus is on Making Art in the Presence of the Analyst, Jung and Aging and Jungian Art Therapy. She was recently guest co-editor of a special issue of Psychological Perspectives, “Aging and Individuation.”
    • Friday, November 03, 2017
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Butler Boardroom of the American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington D.C. 20016
    • 80
    Register

    Lecture

    A funny thing happens on the way to the grave — we often pause to laugh. Why do we laugh? What is comedy? How is it related to its cousin tragedy?  Dour Freud wrote a book on jokes, and Jung, noted for his Olympian laughter, barely touches the subject.  Various perspectives on comedy will be illustrated with jokes, so be prepared to laugh.  In fact, please bring a joke of your own.

    James Hollis, Ph. D., is a Zurich-trained Jungian analyst in practice in Washington, D. C. where he is also Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington. He is also author of fourteen books translated into nineteen languages. 

    • Saturday, November 04, 2017
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 0

    Sorry, but this event is now sold out. You can join the waitlist and we will send you an email when additional spaces become available.

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    A Day With ...
    The poetry of Mary Oliver offers a treasure of images and wealth of symbols that invite us to meet parts of ourselves that have turned dead in the deal we make to stay alive. Ann Belford Ulanov suggests we repress parts of ourselves like the capacity for hope or insight, anger or healing that the language of poetry can touch and woo out of our darkness. Our wholeness, a completeness we are slow to assemble, is made up of broken and forgotten parts, rather than a seamless excellence or elusive one and true self. Mary Oliver’s poems assist in what Ulanov describes as “collecting all our laundry, even the fugitive socks that seem to lead a life all their own,” in Jung’s words, “evoking a religious attitude of careful observation and attentive pondering.” Rather than provide answers, Mary Oliver poses questions that encourage and assist us in welcoming a fuller story of ourselves that awaits our owning and telling.

    Bill Dols has served parishes in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina as an Episcopal priest for twenty-five years. While pursuing graduate studies in psychology and biblical studies in Berkeley in the 1980s, he began leading seminars for The Guild For Psychological Studies in San Francisco. After eight years as Director of The Educational Center in St. Louis, he moved to Charlotte where, until his retirement in 2001, he served as Minister of Adult Education at The Myers Park Baptist Church. Bill and Shirley now live in Alexandria, where they tutor public-school first graders, quilt and garden, paint and read. Bill continues to contribute to The Bible Workbench, which he created and edited for twenty years, and on occasion, he leads weekend retreats.

    • Friday, November 10, 2017
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 0

    Sorry, but this event is now sold out. You can join the waitlist and we will send you an email when additional spaces become available.

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    An Evening With...

    In this evening’s program we will explore important aspects of death and the dying process. Some of these experiences were well-known by previous generations far more intimately familiar with death than we are today, while other aspects of death and dying are now being discovered through modern-day research in the fields of consciousness and thanatology.  Topics will include the psychological and spiritual tasks faced by the dying, end-of-life experiences such as nearing-death awareness, death-bed visions and dreams, and terminal lucidity, and the changes in consciousness one undergoes during the death process.  Understanding these phenomena will help each of us prepare for our own death as well as effectively support others as they die.

    Mary Ann Melpolder has had a life-long interest in death, bereavement, and the survival of consciousness.  She holds Master's degrees in Thanatology from Hood College and in American Studies with a focus on warfare from the University of Maryland.  She served for two years as a hospice volunteer with Montgomery Hospice working with the dying and their families.  She is a member of the Association for Death, Education, and Counseling, and the International Association of Near-Death Studies.

    • Saturday, November 18, 2017
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 19
    Register
    Discussion Group
    Karen Branan, an investigative journalist, will discuss her book, The Family Tree, a true story of her families' involvement in all sides of a Georgia lynching.  She'll reveal how she got the story, including the role of dreams, and how the journey transformed her, as well as the ways the book continues to bring her together with unknown cousins, both Black and White.    

    Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.

    • Friday, December 01, 2017
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Sanctuary Room, Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016
    Register

    Lecture

    "Envy and jealousy are awesome and subtle forces in human nature and favorite allies of our individual and collective shadows@ Sir Laurence van set Post, Epilogue from, The Life and Work of C.G. Jung

    In his Forward to The I Ching, Jung wrote, "Since a share in something great always arouses envy, the chorus of the envious is part of the picture. "

    Through the lens of analytic psychology, this lecture and workshop explores the role that envy and jealousy play in human relationships. We will look at their archetypal nature and the teleology of the symptoms. We will try to understand what makes us vulnerable to these emotions and ultimately, how they can lead to either destruction or transformation. Mythology, fairy tales and literature as well as dreams and examples from personal life will amplify the role that these difficult emotions play in the individuation process.

    Julie Bondanza, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and a diplomate Jungian analyst who trained at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she was Director of Training, a job she also held with the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts.  She has taught extensively in New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, and Washington, as well as for various Jung societies across the country.   Presently she serves the board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York and continues to serve as its program chair, a post she has held for many years.  Dr. Bondanza practices in Takoma Park and lives in Washington, D.C.

    Directions to the Butler Boardroom at the American University here.


    • Saturday, December 02, 2017
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • The Memorial Hall, Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016
    Register

    Workshop

    "Envy and jealousy are awesome and subtle forces in human nature and favorite allies of our individual and collective shadows@ Sir Laurence van set Post, Epilogue from, The Life and Work of C.G. Jung

    In his Forward to The I Ching, Jung wrote, "Since a share in something great always arouses envy, the chorus of the envious is part of the picture. "

    Through the lens of analytic psychology, this lecture and workshop explores the role that envy and jealousy play in human relationships. We will look at their archetypal nature and the teleology of the symptoms. We will try to understand what makes us vulnerable to these emotions and ultimately, how they can lead to either destruction or transformation. Mythology, fairy tales and literature as well as dreams and examples from personal life will amplify the role that these difficult emotions play in the individuation process.

    Julie Bondanza, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and a diplomate Jungian analyst who trained at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she was Director of Training, a job she also held with the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts. She has taught extensively in New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, and Washington, as well as for various Jung societies across the country. Presently she serves the board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York and continues to serve as its program chair, a post she has held for many years. Dr. Bondanza practices in Takoma Park and lives in Washington, D.C.

    Directions to the Butler Boardroom at the American University here.

Please read before you register

The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit educational institution. Although many of the Jung Society's programs involve analytical psychology and allied subjects, these offerings are intended, and should be viewed, as a source of information and education, and not as therapy. The Jung Society does not offer psychoanalytical or other mental health services.

Cancellation Policy: Registration for Jung Society of Washington events may be canceled with a full refund until one week before the event's date. Thereafter, refunds are not available.

Please refrain from wearing intense perfumes and other fragrances when you attend our programs as some people may be sensitive to them. We thank you in advance.

OUR MISSION
The Jung Society of Washington brings the general public and professional community the insights and tools of analytic psychology and related disciplines. Through programs, classes, visiting speakers, partnerships with like organizations, and digital media, the Jung Society creates a platform for communal discussion regarding the personal and cultural issues that confront us. The tools these programs provide assist individuals, relationships, and societies in a dialogue that enhances understanding the unconscious dynamics that course through personal lives, cultural problems, and historic patterns.

JUNG SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON
5200 Cathedral Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20016
CALL: 202-237-8109
EMAIL: jungsociety@jung.org

OFFICE & LIBRARY HOURS:
Weekdays: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

DIRECTIONS
BY CAR: From MacArthur Blvd., turn east (away from the Potomac River) onto Cathedral at the light between Loughboro and Arizona.

BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT: D6 bus line.
Parking is available in the streets.
Entrance to the Jung Society library and office is from the side street, Hawthorne Place.


The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit educational institution. Although many of the Jung Society's programs involve analytical psychology and allied subjects, these offerings are intended, and should be viewed, as a source of information and education, and not as therapy. The Jung Society does not offer psychoanalytical or other mental health services.
Images of mandalas throughout this site were created by Carl Jung's patients between the years 1926 and 1945.

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