a container for the psyche in an uncertain world

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Programs 

PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER
The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit educational institution. Although many of the Jung Society's programs involve analytical psychology and allied subjects, these offerings are intended, and should be viewed, as a source of information and education, and not as therapy. The Jung Society does not offer psychoanalytical or other mental health services. Our policy doesn't allow us to refer you to analysts or therapists.
For the list of local Jungian Analysts, please go
HERE.

CANCELLATION POLICY
We require at least seven days notice prior to the first class meeting or event to cancel a registration with a full refund. We do not pro-rate courses. Occasionally a small program is in danger of cancellation due to insufficient registration, so if you’re planning to come, please register. 

    • Friday, March 01, 2019
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Butler Board Room, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW Washington D.C. 20016
    Register

    Lecture

    What can a long-forgotten myth tell us about the ways that we love or resist loving, the ways in which we both seek and fear human connection? We’re familiar enough with the ancient Greek notion of Eros and with images of cupids, and we may recall that Jung positioned Eros as a principle at the center of his psychology. But what might the myth of his forgotten brother, Anteros, add to the equation?

    In one version of his story, Aphrodite, the mother of Eros, noticed that her child would not grow. Following the advice of her sister, Themis, she had a second child, fathered by Ares, the god of war. The story says that as long as Anteros was present, Eros would grow, but when Anteros was absent, Eros regressed.

    This lecture examines how the cult of Anteros compensated for a collective erotic problem in classical Athenian society. We will consider why Anteros emerged when and where he did. And we can ask, what are the collective erotic problems in our day, and what might Anteros bring to a maturing of our experience of Eros?

    Craig E. Stephenson, PhDis a graduate of the C. G. Jung Institut Zürich, the Institut für Psychodrama auf der Grundlage der Jungschen Psychologie, Zumikon, and the Centre for Psychoanalytic Studies, University of Essex.  His books include Possession: Jung’s Comparative Anatomy of the Psyche(2009/2016), Anteros: A Forgotten Myth (2011), and Jung and Moreno: Essays on the Theatre of Human Nature (2013). For the Philemon Foundation, he edited On Psychological and Visionary Art: Notes from C. G. Jung’s Lecture on Gérard de Nerval’s Aurélia(2015).  He serves as Director of Training for the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association, New York City.

    https://www.craigestephenson.com/

    Directions to Community Meeting venue - AUs Butler Board Room.pdf

    • Saturday, March 02, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • The Butler Board Room, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW Washington D.C. 20016
    Register

    Seminar

    Who is Anteros? In one story, Aphrodite, the mother of Eros, noticed that her child would not grow. Following the advice of her sister, Themis, she had a second child, fathered by Ares, the god of war. The story says that as long as Anteros was present, Eros would grow, but when Anteros was absent, Eros regressed.

    In this seminar we will track how the myth of Anteros disappears and reappears throughout the centuries, from classical Athens, through the Italian Renaissance, the French Enlightenment, English Modernism, and into our time. What is he doing tucked into the corner of a painting by Titian, or rationalized in an entry in the Encyclopédie of the French Enlightenment, or unacknowledged but standing at the center of Piccadilly Circus in London?

    We will consider the significance of how his forgotten myth resurfaces in so many different cultural contexts. And we will also ask how Anteros might challenge us in our experience of loving and in our understanding of the psychotherapeutic process.

    Craig E. Stephenson, PhD, is a graduate of the C. G. Jung Institut Zürich, the Institut für Psychodrama auf der Grundlage der Jungschen Psychologie, Zumikon, and the Centre for Psychoanalytic Studies, University of Essex.  His books include Possession: Jung’s Comparative Anatomy of the Psyche(2009/2016), Anteros: A Forgotten Myth (2011), and Jung and Moreno: Essays on the Theatre of Human Nature (2013). For the Philemon Foundation, he edited On Psychological and Visionary Art: Notes from C. G. Jung’s Lecture on Gérard de Nerval’s Aurélia(2015).  He serves as Director of Training for the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association, New York City.

    Directions to Community Meeting venue - AUs Butler Board Room.pdf
    • Tuesday, March 05, 2019
    • Tuesday, March 26, 2019
    • 4 sessions
    • The Sanctuary Room, Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016
    Register

    Course

    Just how free are we anyhow?  Despite the growing evidence of genetic tendencies, neurological programs, and social influences, all religious, political, ethical systems hold us accountable for how we live our lives and the consequences that flow therefrom. This course will explore a range of topics from the many influences that work on our lives to the attitudes and practices that we may adopt for a life of accountability, dignity, and perhaps even freedom.

    Reading: James Hollis, Creating a Life: Finding Your Individual Path (available on Amazon, or on order from your local bookseller).

    James Hollis, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Washington, D.C., Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington, and author of fifteen other books.
    • Wednesday, March 13, 2019
    • Wednesday, April 03, 2019
    • 4 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 12
    Register

    Course

    Our exploration centers upon this question, put as a test to Gawain by Ragnell, the Loathly Lady in the Grail Legend. The correct answer, “Sovereignty,” seems as illusive to today’s collective imagining as it was in the Middle Ages.

    We construct a portrait of woman’s journey to authenticity by tracking two motifs in story and film: women’s struggle to live authentically in a society largely cut off from the feminine principle, and the ongoing relevance of myth in portraying the Feminine Divine as an (often hidden) ally on the journey toward wholeness. We will share stories that retain timeless truths about the works of the Feminine Divine, her creative and mercurial aspects, and the urgent need to balance feminine and masculine principles in ourselves and in our culture. Our encounters demonstrate how we can envisage the Feminine Divine, not simply as an archaic figure long buried in collective memory, but as a life force rising out of one’s relationship with land, sky, night dreams, and one another.

    Readings: If Women Rose Rooted: The Journey to Authenticity and Belonging by Sharon Blackie, September Publishing, 2016 (available from Amazon, or on order from your local bookseller); other readings to be distributed on site.

    Films: The Summer House, director Waris Hussein, 1993 (based on the novel The Clothes in the Wardrobe by Alice Thomas Ellis); The Piano, directed and written by Jane Campion, 1993.

    **snow date: April 10th

    Melanie Starr Costello, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist, historian, and senior Jungian analyst in private practice in Washington, D.C.  She is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute-Zurich and earned her doctorate in the History and Literature of Religions from Northwestern University.  She formerly served as Assistant Professor of History at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, was a Trustee for the Consortium for Psychoanalytic Research in Washington, D.C., and is currently Director of Education for the Jungian Analysts of Washington, a member of the Board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York, and a training analyst for the C.G. Jung Institute-Zurich.  Dr. Costello has taught and published on the topics of psychology and religion, medieval spirituality, aging, and clinical practice.  Her study of the link between illness and insight, Imagination, Illness and Injury: Jungian Psychology and the Somatic Dimensions of Perception, is published by Routledge Press.

    • Friday, March 15, 2019
    • 12:00 PM - 3:00 PM
    • The Memorial Hall, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 19
    Register
    Workshop

    You will have plenty of space to spread out in to work with tempura paint, large format paper and broad brushes. The goal will be to enter into a mindful place and without many prompts from the facilitator begin to paint expressively. You will be helped to discover your safe space to dip into the well of personal and collective creativity.

    There will be time to experience resonance with the shapes and colors that find their way onto your paper.  What do you see?  How does your painting affect you?  It has been shown that even 45 minutes of absorption with making art reduces stress levels.

    Reference to Jungian concepts will be introduced.  Active imagination, the descent into our inner landscapes and an invitation to psyche to awaken to the symbolic attitude. All of this can be expected.

    JUNG MUST BE EXPERIENCED TO BE UNDERSTOOD.

    Sondra Geller,  MA, ATR-BC, LPC, is a Jungian Analyst, Board Certified Registered Art Therapist, and Licensed Professional Counselor.  She has a private practice in Washington, D.C., where she sees clients individually and in groups.  Her work reflects a synthesis of the principals of both Jungian Analytic Psychology and Art Therapy.  Sandy also teaches and presents experiential workshops focusing on the dynamics of making art in the presence of the analyst.  What happens in the silent space between client/artist and Jungian analyst/observer, and how does this dynamic facilitate the journey of individuation?  http://sondrageller.com/


    • Saturday, March 16, 2019
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 23
    Register

    Discussion Group

    On March 16th , Beverly Fourier will present on tribalism’s “us versus them” expression in contemporary American life and some of its historical expressions.   Unconscious bias, hate speech and propaganda are expressions of a recurring fear and hatred of the “Other”.

     Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.

    • Monday, March 18, 2019
    • Monday, May 13, 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 12
    Register
    Course

    This semester our readings will focus on family dynamics, specifically fathers and sons and mothers and daughters. We will start with A Jest of God by Margaret Lawrence. This book is also known as Rachel, Rachel , and there is a wonderful movie that uses that name. Then we will read Gilead by Marilynne Robinson, My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof by Tennessee Williams, and finally we will end with the classic novel: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith.


    Julie Bondanza, Ph.D.,
    is a licensed psychologist and a diplomate Jungian analyst who trained at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she was Director of Training, a job she also held with the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts. She has taught extensively in New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Washington, as well as for various Jung societies across the country. Presently she serves the board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York and continues to serve as its program chair, a post she has held for many years. Dr. Bondanza practices in Takoma Park and lives in Washington, D.C.

    • Monday, March 25, 2019
    • Monday, May 20, 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 20
    Register
    Course

    Transference is that peculiar dynamic where one transfers aspects of his/her relationship with figures from the past such as parents onto the analyst or therapist. While this applies in the analytic container, it happens universally in the outer world with work , friends, and community relationships. Countertransference is the therapist’s emotional entanglement with the patient.  The relationship of the tensions of opposites between the analyst and analysand (love/hate, mother/child, bad/good, nurturing/neglectful, etc.) allows for unconscious material to become conscious to be worked upon, integrated, and resolved. Using the symbolic lens of the 16th century Rosarium pictures, Jung describes the process of individuation via the transference. The elements used in the opus were comprised of opposites because the attraction of opposites led to a conjunction and the production of a new substance different than the original two. In the opus of one’s inner work, the relationship to another creates the opportunity to become conscious of our own opposite and one-sided attitudes thus leading to the replacement of an old attitude with a new attitude. This essay speaks to one’s inner transformation regardless of being in analysis or not and allows for reflection of one’s process with others.

    The reading for the first class includes the Foreword to The Psychology of the Transference as well as Paragraphs 353- 401.

    Please take one paragraph that you found meaningful and write a brief reflection to  discuss in class.

    Rosanne Shepler is a Licensed Professional Counselor and Licensed Psychoanalyst who received her Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute of New York in 2002.  She also holds masters degrees in Health Education and Counseling.  She is a past president of JAWA and a past treasurer of both JAWA and NYAAP.  She is on the Curriculum Committee and Teaching Faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York.  She’s a member of JAWA, the New York Association for Analytical Psychology (NYAAP), the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts (IRSJA), and the International Association of Analytical Psychology (IAAP). 

    • Friday, March 29, 2019
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 16
    Register

    An Evening with...

    Every artist, every craftsperson, every gardener, and every writer needs a toolbox filled with the right tools for her or his craft— utensils, instruments, and devices to help shape their creation and ease the task at hand. This is how they get “suited up” for the work, and for the journey into creativity and authenticity.

    This is also true in the world of Jungian-based psychotherapy, archetypal pattern analysis, and depth psychology. Without the proper tools for the task, those lovely dream contents run through consciousness like water through a sieve. As Jung said, we need a method, an analytical method that involves the mastery of a set of tools designed to contain and process psychological material. The design and use of tools, methods, and technical language, developed within the Jungian framework, are essential components for work with dreams, fairy tales, mythology, and one’s own creative works.

    I believe that these analytical tools are meant to be shared. In addition to their use with therapy clients, they have helped me unravel my story and move me along my path of self-discovery. The toolbox includes models from C.G. Jung’s method of dream analysis, Michael Conforti’s methods for archetypal pattern analysis, and the works of other masters of depth psychology. They also include techniques from narrative theory and my own work.

    We will practice using some of these fundamental methods and guidelines from my toolbox. A good way to practice is to work with fairy tales, films, books, and myths; we will practice using elements from some well-known myths and fairy tales, scenes from the plays of William Shakespeare, and dreams of people like you and me.

    These practical “tools of the trade” are designed to help you on the path of self-discovery, and with a little practice, they can be grasped and applied. It is time to make them yours, and I hope that they help to move you more deeply into your own story, creativity, and your own authentic self.

    Bonnie L. Damron, PhD, LCSW is a psychotherapist, ethnographer, storyteller, and Archetypal Pattern Analyst in private practice in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. During her thirty-four years in practice, she has conducted seminars on archetypal motifs in fairy tales, myths, the arts, and the writings of C.G. Jung. She also leads study tours to Crete and the Greek mainland. Dr. Damron holds a Masters of Social Work degree from Catholic University, a Doctoral Degree in American Culture Studies from the University of Maryland, and a Certificate as an Archetypal Pattern Analyst from the Assisi Institute for Archetypal Studies.

    • Saturday, March 30, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 17
    Register
    A Day with...

    During this session will continue with our work with the Pattern Analyst’s Toolbox.

    Bonnie L. Damron, PhD, LCSW is a psychotherapist, ethnographer, storyteller, and Archetypal Pattern Analyst in private practice in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. During her thirty-four years in practice, she has conducted seminars on archetypal motifs in fairy tales, myths, the arts, and the writings of C.G. Jung. She also leads study tours to Crete and the Greek mainland. Dr. Damron holds a Masters of Social Work degree from Catholic University, a Doctoral Degree in American Culture Studies from the University of Maryland, and a Certificate as an Archetypal Pattern Analyst from the Assisi Institute for Archetypal Studies.

    • Tuesday, April 02, 2019
    • Tuesday, April 30, 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016
    • 17
    Register

    Course

    The hero's journey is one of the inevitable callings of life. Accepted or rejected, it is there in life's different stages and challenges. C.G. Jung believed the hero's journey to be a necessary part of becoming fully human, which he referred to as individuation.

    In this course, we shall explore the hero's journey in its continuing and changing relevance for our lives, personal and social – with all its complexes and traumas and potential for finding a treasure hard to find. To assist us in our shared journey, we shall revisit Joseph Campbell's The Hero with a Thousand Faces, invoke heroic tales of old and enlist some key insights of C.G. Jung. In this way and through the hero/heroine motifs and images that arise, we shall orient ourselves within whatever may be the heroic challenge of our moment.
    Class format will be presentation with invited discussion and reading (optional, e.g., The Hero with a Thousand Faces).

    Mark Napack, M.A., S.T.L., M.S, first studied the hero's journey as a student of comparative literature at Columbia University, after which he applied Joseph Campbell's The Hero with a Thousand Faces to the redemption motif in medieval theology for his thesis at Fordham University. He further studied Jung, psychology and the history of religion at Loyola and Catholic Universities. A long-time graduate and college lecturer, Mark has a special concern for areas of psychology and spirituality and an ongoing involvement with the Collected Works of Jung and Jungian classics. He has presented at international conferences and published in scholarly publications. Mark Napack, LCPC is also a Jungian informed psychotherapist in North Bethesda, MD.

    • Thursday, April 04, 2019
    • Thursday, April 25, 2019
    • 4 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 8
    Register

    Book Exploration Course, Part 2

    From the Back Matter: [This volume is] “a brilliant delineation of the objective psyche and how it has been experienced through the ages –– from primitive religion to nuclear physics and synchronicity. It is Jungian Psychology at its finest.” ~Edward F. Edinger

    Text: Projection and Re-Collection in Jungian Psychology, by Marie-Louise von Franz

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Friday, April 05, 2019
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Sanctuary of the Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 97
    Register

    Lecture 

    While our life is truly a unique and very personal experience, it is also shaped by universal, archetypal influences.   Each life transition — from childhood, to adolescence, to adulthood, and onto to our later years — carries the etching of humanity’s collective, archetypal history, which influences the way we respond to each. 

    Finding a form that captures something of its essence, the archetype is expressed through patterns.  Here we find a living and vital experience of the archetypal as it creates a relationship to our emotional and sensorial world, allowing us to see, to feel, and most importantly, to know something of its message for our life.  Our inner and outer worlds are replete with these patterns, each telling the story of the life of the soul and the life that the Self wants us to live.  However, learning to discern these messages remains a challenge.  

    Adolph Portmann, zoologist and long-time collaborator with Jung, speaks of the beauty of these natural patterns that tell  the story of a life and one's place in this journey: “The plumage is not the only outward manifestation that changes with the inner state; in birds the song, the call . . .  gives eloquent expression not only to momentary changes of mood but also to the great rhythms of life.  We have all noticed how the sound of the woods changes with the seasons, even though no birds may be in sight: how lively the forest is in May, in the spring, when even the invisible inhabitants bear witness to their life in songs and calls, and how different in late summer, how strange this silence reflecting the metamorphosis of the hidden songbirds."  

    Our songs are heard and seen in the way we live our life, in whom and to what we are drawn, and in those patterns that  just  won’t let us go.  In tonight’s lecture, we will look at the presence of psyche and archetypes in the patterns of our unique life, the ways in which we might sense an intimation of their meaning, of their calling, and what they entrust to us.

    Michael Conforti, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and founder of the Assisi Institute.   He has been a faculty member at the C. G. Jung Institute in Boston, the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York, and for many years a Senior Associate faculty member in the Doctoral and Master’s Programs in Clinical Psychology at Antioch New England.  A pioneer in the field of matter-psyche studies, Dr. Conforti is actively investigating the workings of archetypal fields and the relationship between Jungian psychology and the New Sciences.  He is the author of two books, Threshold Experiences: The Archetype of Beginnings and Field, Form, and Fate: Patterns in Mind, Nature, and Psyche. He is currently working on a new book, Hidden Presence: Archetypes, Spells, Possessions, and the Complex.  Dr. Conforti maintains a private practice in Mystic, Connecticut, and consults with individuals and corporations around the world.   

    • Saturday, April 06, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, N.W., Washington D.C. 20016
    • 17
    Register

    A Day with...

    "When you are not quite at home with yourself . . . you are approaching a neurotic condition.”  -C.G. Jung, CW 18, p. 383.  

    While we all long for a wonderful life of love, friendships, meaning, and the feeling that we are living the life that we are meant to live, we are nevertheless often led astray.  At times the allure turns out to be of fools’ gold, or the workings of a complex that keeps us shackled to an endless series of Sisyphean endeavors; yet, these frustrations make us ever-more aware and hungering for the life that is destined for us.

    Even through the inevitable fog of complexes, confusion, and missed opportunities, the patterns of benevolence, redemption, and of the Self never fade but continue to beckon, calling us to live the life awaiting in potentia.

    In this workshop we will speak about the ability to recognize the patterns of individual and collective life. Through illustrations from clinical practice, to stories from literature and cinema, we will together observe the patterns emerging within the inner and outer worlds and ways to sense the archetypal meaning of each.

    Michael Conforti, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and founder of the Assisi Institute.   He has been a faculty member at the C. G. Jung Institute in Boston, the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York, and for many years a Senior Associate faculty member in the Doctoral and Master’s Programs in Clinical Psychology at Antioch New England.  A pioneer in the field of matter-psyche studies, Dr. Conforti is actively investigating the workings of archetypal fields and the relationship between Jungian psychology and the New Sciences.  He is the author of two books, Threshold Experiences: The Archetype of Beginnings and Field, Form, and Fate: Patterns in Mind, Nature, and Psyche. He is currently working on anew book, Hidden Presence: Archetypes, Spells, Possessions, and the Complex.  Dr. Conforti maintains a private practice in Mystic, Connecticut, and consults with individuals and corporations around the world.

    • Friday, April 12, 2019
    • 12:00 PM - 3:00 PM
    • The Memorial Hall, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 13
    Register
    Workshop

    “In the last analysis the human body, too, is built of the stuff of the world, the very stuff wherein fantasies become visible; indeed, without it they could not be experienced at all.” Jung 1940, CW 9.1, par. 290

    Explore the fascinating world of movement in an experiential workshop that requires nothing more than a willingness to play and a curiosity about the movement life of our experiences.  We will explore everyday gestural and task-oriented movements that acquire personal meaning as we vary their spatial range and pathways, play with their timing, and alter their sequence and phrasing.  Images and narratives will emerge as we attune to our deep inner well of movement memory and associations. 

    We will also take time to reflect on our own movement preferences that emerge and look, through a movement analysis lens, at ways to explore the personal meaning those preferences hold for us.  Our bodies long to speak, and they love to play.  In the words of C. G. Jung:

    “The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect, but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity.  The creative mind plays with the objects it loves.”  Jung 1921, CW 6, par. 197

    Anne Warren is Professor Emerita in Dance at UMD.  She is a CMA (Certified Movement Analyst) in Laban/Bartenieff Movement Studies and a former dancer and choreographer. She applied her movement analysis training to the development of interdisciplinary courses in the Honors college, helping students from a wide range of majors explore the movement life of ideas in their disciplines.

    FAQ

    Is this a dance class?

    No, but maybe a better answer would be that it depends on your definition of dance.  We will be exploring the highly developed movement language that all of us have already acquired throughout a lifetime of embodied experience and expression.  We are all dancers in our lives.

    Is any skill or prior knowledge required?

    No, you already have a very rich palette of movement available to you.  You will be able to make choices and attune to your comfort level in all of the movement explorations.  That includes the option to just observe at any point when you need or want to. 

    What is the format of the class?

    The class is experiential.  We will be alternately moving and talking throughout the class. 

    What should I wear?

    Whatever you are comfortable wearing, but do wear comfortable shoes.

    Anything else?

    Yes, leave your inner critic at home that day.   The inner critic and the inner child don’t play well together in movement explorations.


    • Friday, April 12, 2019
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 17
    Register

    An Evening With...

    Trauma isn’t just for the unlucky victims in the accident we pass by on the road. The traumatic impact of death, violence, illness and loneliness is a dark deity in the heart of our everyday psychological and biological reality. The compelling fear and darkness of seemingly intractable traumas can become the central theme that patterns and re-patterns our daily lives. In this program we will explore ways to wake the dormant transformational energies within trauma itself. 

    The enthralling power of this condition can be overwhelming and petrifying. Strong measures are needed to counteract it. Jung advises, ”I would not rest until amid the pain a light appeared to me, for in excessu affectus [in an excess of affect or passion] Nature reverses herself.”  

    How might we arouse a healing passion that actually encourages nature to reverse herself? In each deep trauma there lies a paradoxical matrix, a flow chart of energy, that if recognized, can awaken our own embodied, unique divinity.

    Timothy Lyons, LCSW, is a Jungian-oriented psychotherapist in private practice for individuals, couples and families in Capitol Hill, Washington D.C., and Takoma Park, Maryland. He has a post graduate certificate from the Philadelphia Jung Institute and is a frequent presenter at the Jung Society of Washington. His post graduate studies also include infant observation and art therapy and studies in Tibetan Buddhism, Taoism, and yoga philosophies. He has completed teacher training in Trul Khor (Tibetan yoga). His earlier career as architect and editor includes articles for the Washington Post and lectures at the Smithsonian Institution.

    • Wednesday, April 17, 2019
    • Wednesday, May 22, 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 12
    Register

    Course 

    How dream images can guide our paths toward a fuller and more meaningful life? In Part II of Psychology and Alchemy, C.G. Jung uses a dream series of a young man to illustrate the unconscious processes at work.

    Jung writes, “As manifestations of conscious processes the dreams rotate or circumambulate round the centre, drawing closer to it as the amplifications increase in distinctness and in scope.”

    This unfolding process leads the dreamer toward a new personality center that Jung calls the “self.” Throughout this dream-series study, Jung focuses on the archetypal symbols of unity known as mandala symbolism. How are mandala symbols shown to be present in the initial dreams and throughout the individuation process?

    In this course we will focus on the mandala symbolism in a dream series, the psychic process as seen through the dream images, and the individual dream symbolism in relation to alchemy.

    Reading: Psychology and Alchemy, CW 12, Part II. Course format is "read and discuss". 

    Cathryn Polonchak,  L.C.S.W., is a certified Jungian Analyst and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of West Virginia.  She has a private practice in the Shepherdstown and the Charles Town/Harpers Ferry areas of West Virginia.  In addition to her membership in JAWA, Cathryn is a member of the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts (PAJA), the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts (IRSJA), the International Association of Analytical Psychology (IAAP), and the National Association of Social Workers (NASW).  She was the past Director of Seminar for PAJA.  She is interested in the interface between body and mind, particularly at the psyche-soma level of trauma.

    • Saturday, April 20, 2019
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 21
    Register

    Discussion Group

    On April 20th Karen DiBenedetto will present and lead our group discussion on the Temples of Malta and Gozo.

    Halfway between North Africa and Europe, the Mediterranean islands of Malta and Gozo are home to extraordinary temples resonating to a vibrant Goddess culture over 6,000 years old. 

    Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.
    • Friday, April 26, 2019
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Sanctuary of the Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register

    Lecture 

    One of the most calming and powerful actions you can do to intervene in a stormy world is to stand up and show your soul. Soul on deck shines like gold in dark times
    – Clarissa Pinkola Estes

    In December,1913, C.G. Jung – disoriented and overcome with visions of destruction – willingly ‘plunged’ into the dark depths of the unconscious. So begins the story of The Red Book. For three months he conscientiously wrote down his fantasies; and for sixteen years, he elaborated on them, writing commentaries in his journal and copying them into The Red Book. In so doing, Jung found his myth, his life’s premise.

    In this lecture, we will consider The Red Book as Jung’s journey through darkness to light, his journey of individuation. Through our own journaling we can make the same journey. We will look at the practice of journaling as active imagination, with examples from Jung’s journals and from the journals of Etty Hillesum and Thomas Merton.

    We will see how journaling is a form of alchemy: the darkening nigredo, the distilling albedo, the new awareness rubedo. We will take a step in our own journey to greater consciousness.

    Susan Tiberghien, an American writer living in Geneva, Switzerland, has published three memoirs: Looking for Gold, Circling to the Center, Footsteps-A European Album, and the highly appreciated writing book,  One Year to a Writing Life, plus two new titles published in 2015: Side by Side: Writing Your Love Story and Footsteps:  In Love with a Frenchman.  Her most recent book, Writing Toward Wholeness, Lessons Inspired by C.G.Jung was published March 1 by Chiron Publications. She has been teaching writing workshops for close to twenty years at C.G. Jung Centers, at the International Women’s Writing Guild, and at writers’ centers and conferences in the States and in Europe where she directs the Geneva Writers’ Group, an association of 250 English-language writers.
    Find her at www.susantiberghien.com

    • Saturday, April 27, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, N.W., Washington D.C. 20016
    • 16
    Register

    A Day with...

    In this workshop, we will review Jung’s journey through darkness to light as described in The Red Book and see how, through journaling, we can make our own journey. In the morning we will look at different ways to journal, reading excerpts from Jung, also from Etty Hillesum and Marion Woodman.

    We will write a journal entry, and listening to Jung’s words, we will do an exercise in active imagination. In the afternoon we will look at the practice of alchemy and at how the three steps – nigredo, albedo, and rubedo – can lead us to new awareness in our journals. We will become alchemists and find ways to share our gold.

    Susan Tiberghien, an American writer living in Geneva, Switzerland, has published three memoirs: Looking for Gold, Circling to the Center, Footsteps-A European Album, and the highly appreciated writing book,  One Year to a Writing Life, plus two new titles published in 2015: Side by Side: Writing Your Love Story and Footsteps:  In Love with a Frenchman.  Her most recent book, Writing Toward Wholeness, Lessons Inspired by C.G.Jung was published March 1 by Chiron Publications. She has been teaching writing workshops for close to twenty years at C.G. Jung Centers, at the International Women’s Writing Guild, and at writers’ centers and conferences in the States and in Europe where she directs the Geneva Writers’ Group, an association of 250 English-language writers.
    Find her at www.susantiberghien.com

    • Thursday, May 02, 2019
    • Thursday, May 30, 2019
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 6
    Register
    Course

    Twelve students of Jung will gather on five Thursday evenings in May. In the course of the five classes, each will be invited to share a meaningful dream. A safe and protected space will be established. Jung called such a space the temenos. The supportive power of the group will then be called into action. As the dreamer reads her dream the others listen intently, especially focusing on images presented in the dream or images that the dream evokes in the listeners. Then the dreamer reads the dream again. At this time the whole group is asked to make a quick sketch of the part of the dream that they find the most compelling. Afterwards, the drawings are shared. This experience has the potential of deepening the dream for the dreamer. They may see things in the dream they hadn’t noticed before. And the whole group benefits from the experience of listening intently, of developing their understanding of the symbolic attitude of the psyche. They are often opened to the experience of the numinous. Participants have said that it can be ‘transformational.’

    Sondra Geller,  MA, ATR-BC, LPC, is a Jungian Analyst, Board Certified Registered Art Therapist, and Licensed Professional Counselor.  She has a private practice in Washington, D.C., where she sees clients individually and in groups.  Her work reflects a synthesis of the principals of both Jungian Analytic Psychology and Art Therapy.  Sandy also teaches and presents experiential workshops focusing on the dynamics of making art in the presence of the analyst.  What happens in the silent space between client/artist and Jungian analyst/observer, and how does this dynamic facilitate the journey of individuation? 

    • Friday, May 03, 2019
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Sanctuary of the Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Avenue N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016
    Register

    Lecture

    How have some of Jung’s ideas been used to (mis)interpret Native cultures? Some examples are the notion of the “primitive,” participation mystique, dreams, and animals. We will explore these ideas as we look at them through "native eyes." Participants will also be introduced to two psychic paradigms: dominion and reciprocity.  These point to important differences between Indigenous and Western cosmologies and may offer a path away from our current trend toward self-destruction.          

    Jeanne Lacourt, Ph.D.,  MS, LPC, NCC, Ph.D., is a Professor of American Indian Studies at St. Cloud State University in Minnesota, a faculty of the Minnesota Seminar in Jungian Studies, and a Jungian Analyst in private practice.  She has authored a book on traditional Indian Education and her more recent articles in Spring Journal focus on the intersections of Indigenous and Jungian Studies.  She is most intrigued with the theme of human-animal transformation in Indigenous origin stories.  Her home community is with the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin.

    • Saturday, May 04, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • The Sanctuary of the Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, N.W. Washington D.C. 20016
    Register

    Workshop

    Participants will be introduced to the Menominee origin story and the important relationship Native people have with animals. Specifically, we will learn how human-animal transformation in myth is integral to establishing a reciprocal relationship with land, animals and all spirit beings.

    Jeanne Lacourt, Ph.D., MS, LPC, NCC, Ph.D., is a Professor of American Indian Studies at St. Cloud State University in Minnesota, a faculty of the Minnesota Seminar in Jungian Studies, and a Jungian Analyst in private practice.  She has authored a book on traditional Indian Education and her more recent articles in Spring Journal focus on the intersections of Indigenous and Jungian Studies.  She is most intrigued with the theme of human-animal transformation in Indigenous origin stories.  Her home community is with the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin.

    • Friday, May 17, 2019
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 20
    Register

    An Evening With...

    C.G. Jung was fascinated by the figure of Merlin. Jung felt that his own work was a response to "le cri de Merlin" sounding from his forest exile in the legend of the Grail. It was Jung's belief that Merlin continued to live in unredeemed and unconscious form in our psyches and in our world – "His story is not yet finished, and he still walks abroad" (Memories, Dreams, Reflections, p. 228).

    This evening's presentation shall explore the role of Merlin for Jung and his place in Jungian psychology with an eye toward its current relevance. Where now is Merlin for us? What may this mean? And what are we to do about it?

    Mark Napack, M.A.,S.T.L., M.S, studied medieval and comparative literature at Columbia University, after which he worked on Jung, the history of religion, and psychology at Fordham, Catholic and Loyola Universities. A long-time graduate and college lecturer, Mark has a special concern for areas of psychology and spirituality and an ongoing involvement with the Collected Works of Jung and Jungian classics. He has presented at international conferences and published in scholarly publications. Mark Napack, LCPC is also a Jungian informed psychotherapist in North Bethesda, MD.

    • Saturday, May 18, 2019
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 22
    Register

    Discussion Group

    On May 18th Margaret Placentra Johnston will lead a discussion on Reiki which she describes as taking only a second to describe, minutes to experience, and a lifetime to understand.

    Reiki is a healing energy that can be accessed by laying on of hands or over distances using the powers of focus and intent.  It can be used to heal physical and emotional problems in oneself, in other people or animals, and even to ameliorate difficult situations.  

    Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.


    • Friday, June 07, 2019
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Swiss Embassy, 2900 Cathedral Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20008
    • 144
    Register

    Lecture

    EXILE AND HOMECOMING, Personal and Archetypal Narratives in Times of Strife

    All funds raised in the Benefit Evening go towards establishing the Jung Society Scholarship Fund. 

    We are honored to present John Hill as this year’s Jungian Scholar of Distinction. Beloved for the poetic force of his speaking, writing and teaching, this Zurich-based training analyst will address our deepest need and longing to attain a sense of belonging to self, others and place: to be at home in the world.

    John Hill’s thoughtful and poetic work on "Home" has never been more pertinent than it is today. Each one of us has been touched by global currents that disrupt established cultural, economic and social grounding. On a collective level home and its loss continue to create global crises. As teams of migrants move across the globe, searching for fulfillment of this most fundamental need, we who rest secure in our adopted or ancestral homelands feel the fragility of our own sense of belonging to place, self, and one another.

    How do inner and outer experiences of “at-home-ness” converge? The quest for home initiates soul-searching. On a personal level the need for home is an expression of attachment observed in all living beings and the specifically human need to create a world of shared meaningful experiences. But how do we find or reinforce a sense of belonging in such a turbulent world? Hill will present models of home that welcome the stranger without loss of the familiar.

    Join us for this in-depth exploration of Home as the defining archetype of our era.

    Wine and Cheese Reception following the Lecture and discussion!

    John Hill, M.A., earned a diploma in analytical psychology from the Jung Institute of Zurich, where he served for many years as a training analyst, and degrees in philosophy from the University of Dublin and Catholic University. He has a private practice in Zurich and is a training analyst at ISAP-Zurich. Born and raised in Ireland and a graduate of Glenstal Abbey School, he has published, among other works, "Celtic Myth," "Dreams," "Christian Mysticism," and "At Home in the World: Sounds and Symmetries of Belonging."



    • Saturday, June 08, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • The Butler Boardroom, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register

    Workshop

    Anger is aroused by a perceived threat to self or a significant other. We encounter anger between couples, between parents and children, between siblings, neighbors, in the workplace, or in road rage. The darker side of anger terrorizes the other, humiliates the other, make the other submissive. But anger is part of our evolutionary make-up, and belongs to our survival kit. If you are the angry person you make yourself known in no uncertain terms. You cannot afford to ignore an angry person, an angry group or an angry nation. It demands that you make contact with your shadow, voluntarily or involuntarily. It is a call you cannot avoid. It calls you to become who you truly are.

    John Hill, M.A., earned a diploma in analytical psychology from the Jung Institute of Zurich, where he served for many years as a training analyst, and degrees in philosophy from the University of Dublin and Catholic University. He has a private practice in Zurich and is a training analyst at ISAP-Zurich. Born and raised in Ireland and a graduate of Glenstal Abbey School, he has published, among other works, "Celtic Myth," "Dreams," "Christian Mysticism," and "At Home in the World: Sounds and Symmetries of Belonging."

    Directions to the Butler Boardroom at the American University here.

Past Events

Friday, February 15, 2019 RUSSIA'S "SNOW MAIDEN" TALE, a presentation by Philippa Rappoport
Saturday, February 09, 2019 TISSUE PAPER COLLAGE: WHERE JUNG MEETS ART, a workshop with Sondra Geller
Friday, February 08, 2019 INTRODUCTION TO THE ENNEAGRAM, a workshop with Marilyn Finch Williams
Saturday, January 26, 2019 NATURAL CYCLES, NATURAL SYMBOLS: a workshop by Melanie Starr Costello
Friday, January 25, 2019 MOVEMENT AND CREATIVITY, a workshop with Anne Warren
Saturday, December 08, 2018 NATURAL CYCLES, NATURAL SYMBOLS: Individuation as Ecology, a workshop by Melanie Starr Costello
Friday, December 07, 2018 NATURAL CYCLES, NATURAL SYMBOLS: Individuation as Ecology, a lecture by Melanie Starr Costello
Saturday, November 24, 2018 WiseWomen's Forum: Holiday Celebrations, Emotions, Family Ceremonies and Traditions, led by Brenda Freeman
Saturday, November 17, 2018 THE FORM OF THINGS UNKNOWN: What You Know From What You Make, a workshop by Lorne Buchman
Friday, November 16, 2018 THE FORM OF THINGS UNKNOWN: What You Know From What You Make, a lecture by Lorne Buchman
Friday, November 09, 2018 AT JOURNEY’S END: Finding Meaning and Purpose in the Face of Death, An Evening with Mary Ann Melpolder
Friday, November 02, 2018 FRIDAY FILM NIGHT (6): SIX ON SHADOW: The Shadow of Ecology
Thursday, November 01, 2018 DREAMSCAPES: Experiencing Jung, a course by Sondra Geller
Friday, October 26, 2018 FRIDAY FILM NIGHT (5): SIX ON SHADOW: The Responsible Self
Saturday, October 20, 2018 WiseWomen's Forum: Myth as a Pathway to What Seeks a Voice, led by Kelly McGannon
Friday, October 19, 2018 FRIDAY FILM NIGHT (4): SIX ON SHADOW: Paranoia in Politics
Friday, October 12, 2018 SHAMING THE DIVINE CHILD: The Life Cycle of Individuation, An Evening with Tim Lyons
Tuesday, October 09, 2018 BASIC CONCEPTS OF JUNGIAN ANALYSIS, a course by Phyllis LaPlante
Friday, October 05, 2018 FRIDAY FILM NIGHT (3): SIX ON SHADOW: The Symbolism of Evil
Friday, September 28, 2018 PORTRAITS OF PATHOLOGY, a lecture by James Hollis
Thursday, September 27, 2018 REQUIEM: The Experience of Joy Always Begins with Inevitable Loss, a course by Anne Pickup
Saturday, September 22, 2018 THE STRANGER AT THE DOOR: Further Explorations, A Day with Bonnie Damron
Friday, September 21, 2018 THE STRANGER AT THE DOOR, An Evening with Bonnie Damron
Monday, September 17, 2018 AUTHORITY, a course by Julie Bondanza
Saturday, September 15, 2018 WiseWomen's Forum: Shamanism and Altered States, led by Sundance Metelsky
Wednesday, September 12, 2018 JUNG'S MAP OF THE SOUL BY MURRAY STEIN, a book exploration course by April Barrett
Tuesday, September 11, 2018 TRACKING THE GODS: The Movement of Archetypal Powers in our Time, a course by James Hollis
Monday, September 10, 2018 THE GRAIL: Symbolic Story of Radical Renewal, a course by Mark Napack
Friday, September 07, 2018 FRIDAY FILM NIGHT (1): SIX ON SHADOW: What Is Evil?
Friday, September 07, 2018 COFFEE, JUNG AND ART, a morning course by Sondra Geller
Tuesday, June 05, 2018 AN AMERICAN POETIC VOICE, a course by James Hollis
Saturday, June 02, 2018 HEALING TRAUMA: THE LOST AND RECOVERED SOUL-CHILD IN DEPTH PSYCHOTHERAPY: The Jung Memorial Workshop by Don Kalsched
Friday, June 01, 2018 GLIMPSES OF THE "CORE COMPLEX" UNDERLYING TRAUMA AND DISSOCIATION: The Jung Memorial Lecture by Don Kalsched
Tuesday, May 29, 2018 FILM NIGHT (5): JUNG ON THE BIBLE: THE ANSWER TO JOB with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson
Tuesday, May 22, 2018 FILM NIGHT (4): JUNG ON THE JEWISH MYSTICAL TRADITION with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson
Saturday, May 19, 2018 WISE WOMEN'S FORUM: Using Hypnosis for Self-Empowerment, Self-Love and Connecting With Your Higher Self
Saturday, May 19, 2018 WISE WOMEN'S FORUM: Using Hypnosis for Self-Empowerment, Self-Love and Connecting With Your Higher Self
Tuesday, May 15, 2018 FILM NIGHT (3): JUNG ON EASTERN RELIGIONS with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson
Friday, May 11, 2018 A CHINESE JUNGIAN: Ego and Shadow in the Short Stories of Lu Xun, An Evening with Carolyn Brown
Tuesday, May 08, 2018 FILM NIGHT (2): JUNG ON CHRISTIANITY with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson
Saturday, May 05, 2018 FROM JOURNALING & ACTIVE IMAGINATION TO THE PRACTICE OF ZEN: how do we answer our longing for wholeness, A Day with Susan Tiberghien
Friday, May 04, 2018 FROM JOURNALING & ACTIVE IMAGINATION TO THE PRACTICE OF ZEN: how do we answer our longing for wholeness, a lecture by Susan Tiberghien
Thursday, May 03, 2018 JUNG AND THE STORIES WE REMEMBER: An Experiential Class Using the Expressive Arts, Course, Sondra Geller
Wednesday, May 02, 2018 C. G. JUNG'S PSYCHOLOGY AND ALCHEMY: the hidden treasure in the dark matter, Course, Cathryn Polonchak
Tuesday, May 01, 2018 FILM NIGHT (1): PSYCHOLOGY AND RELIGION, Jung's Argument with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson
Saturday, April 28, 2018 WISE WOMEN'S FORUM: The Magdalene Mysteries and the Path of the Blue Rose
Friday, April 20, 2018 ENDINGS ARE BEGINNINGS, An Evening with Jimmy Fox
Saturday, April 07, 2018 INTIMATIONS IN THE NIGHT: The Soul's Call to Return Home, A Day with Michael Conforti
Friday, April 06, 2018 INTIMATIONS IN THE NIGHT: The Soul's Call to Return Home, Lecture, Michael Conforti
Saturday, March 24, 2018 WISE WOMEN'S FORUM: An Astrological Review of 2018- Change and Opportunities
Saturday, March 24, 2018 FAIRY TALE: BEARSKIN A Day with Bonnie Damron
Friday, March 23, 2018 BEARSKIN: A FAIRY TALE FROM THE BROTHERS GRIMM, An Evening with Bonnie Damron
Monday, March 19, 2018 EROS: CARNAL AND SPIRITUAL, Course, Julie Bondanza
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 JUNG'S MAP OF THE SOUL BY MURRAY STEIN, Part 1, Book Exploration Course, April Barrett
Monday, March 12, 2018 BECOMING CONSCIOUS OF THE POWER OF SYNCHRONICITY IN OUR LIVES, Course, Rosanne Shepler
Saturday, March 10, 2018 TAKING CREATIVE ACTION IN TIMES OF CRISIS THROUGH JUNG'S "FOUR GREAT GIFTS OF GRACE": Faith, Hope, Love and Understanding, Workshop, Jennifer Selig, Ph.D.
Friday, March 09, 2018 OUT OF A MOUNTAIN OF DESPAIR, A STONE OF HOPE: The Relationship Between Hope and Despair in Times of Crisis, Lecture, Jennifer Selig, Ph.D.
Tuesday, March 06, 2018 LIVING AN EXAMINED LIFE: WISDOM FOR THE SECOND HALF OF THE JOURNEY, Course, Dr. James Hollis
Friday, February 09, 2018 In-Between Times: Something Gone, Something Not Yet, Lecture by James Hollis
Saturday, December 02, 2017 THE EVIL EYE: Envy and Jealousy, Their Meaning, Origin and Goal, Workshop, Julie Bondanza
Friday, December 01, 2017 THE EVIL EYE: Envy and Jealousy, Their Meaning, Origin and Goal, Lecture, Julie Bondanza
Saturday, November 18, 2017 WISEWOMEN'S FORUM: The Family Tree
Friday, November 10, 2017 DEATH AND THE DYING PROCESS: What We Need to Know as We Face the End of Life, Mary Ann Melpolder
Saturday, November 04, 2017 THE POETRY OF MARY OLIVER AS ECHO OF THE SELF, Bill Dols
Friday, November 03, 2017 FUNNY BONES: on the Psychology of Humor, Lecture by James Hollis
Thursday, October 26, 2017 JUNG AND THE SYMBOLS OF THE SELF: Their Relationship to Individuation, Sondra Geller
Wednesday, October 25, 2017 ALCHEMY, THE HEART IN THE MATTER: Symbols and Images of Psychological Transformation, Cathryn Polonchak
Friday, October 13, 2017 DREAM ART: Connecting to the Dream World through Art, Annilee Oppenheimer and Janet Fox
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY AND A NEW ETHIC, Phyllis LaPlante
Saturday, September 23, 2017 AMERICAN SOUL: Part 1- The Soul of Terror/The Terror of Soul, Part 2- America's Involvement in the Middle East, Workshop, Ron Schenk
Friday, September 22, 2017 AMERICAN SOUL AND THE 'TRUMP' PHENOMENON, Lecture, Ron Schenk
Monday, September 18, 2017 THE COMPLEX, TRAUMA AND NEUROSIS IN LITERATURE, Julie Bondanza
Saturday, September 16, 2017 WISEWOMEN'S FORUM: Signs of the Times: A Reflection on the August 2017 Eclipses
Friday, September 15, 2017 EMBRACING THE SHADOW REALM LUCIDLY: Building the Capacity to Experience Bliss, Tim Lyons
Thursday, September 14, 2017 WAR AND WARRIORS: Archetypal Considerations, Melanie Starr Costello
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 JUNG ON ACTIVE IMAGINATION, April Barrett
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 THE INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS, Dr. James Hollis
Tuesday, June 06, 2017 SOPHIA AS MUSE: Four Philosophical Questions Addressed by Poets , James Hollis
Saturday, June 03, 2017 SOMETHING MORE: Back to Basics , the Jung Memorial Workshop, Ann Ulanov
Friday, June 02, 2017 SOMETHING MORE: What Makes Jung Last? The Jung Memorial Lecture, Ann Ulanov
Saturday, May 20, 2017 WiseWomen's Forum: EXPLORING THE FEMININE THROUGH DREAMS AND DREAM ART, Janet Fox
Friday, May 12, 2017 ONCE UPON A LOSS: A New Look at Cinderella, by Annilee Oppenheimer
Friday, May 05, 2017 THE HIDDEN FEMININE IN WASHINGTON D.C. by Beverly Fourier
Friday, April 28, 2017 PATHS TO WELLBEING, Susan Tiberghien
Saturday, April 22, 2017 TIME OF THE FORGOTTEN: Trauma, Memory and Healing, Michael Conforti
Friday, April 21, 2017 TIME OF THE FORGOTTEN: Trauma, Memory and Healing, Michael Conforti
Friday, April 21, 2017 THE HEART AROUSED: The Poetry of David Whyte, A Day with Bill Dols
Thursday, April 20, 2017 THE SACRED MARRIAGE: Extracting the Prima Materia from Relationships, Tim Lyons
Saturday, April 15, 2017 WiseWomen's Forum: CENTERING: Returning to Our Calm Core, Annilee Oppenheimer
Wednesday, April 05, 2017 JUNG ON ACTIVE IMAGINATION, edited and introduction by Joan Chodorow, led by April Barrett
Friday, March 31, 2017 FILM NIGHT: Active Imagination and the Use of Images in Jungian Analysis, part 2, Murray Stein and Paul Brutsche
Friday, March 24, 2017 FILM NIGHT: Active Imagination and the Use of Images in Jungian Analysis, part 1, with Murray Stein and Paul Brutsche
Saturday, March 18, 2017 WiseWomen's Forum: ARTICULATING THE FEMININE IN THESE TIMES, Deborah Hughes
Thursday, March 16, 2017 JUNG FACE TO FACE: What Happens in the Silent Space between Analyst and Analysand, Sondra Geller
Monday, March 13, 2017 AN ANTIDOTE TO THE EXTERNAL STATE OF AFFAIRS: Exploring the Soul's Journey through Novels and Poetry, Julie Bondanza
Friday, March 10, 2017 CONNECTING THE BODY AND MIND: Complimentarity of Jungian Psychology and Biodanza, Evija Volfa Vestergaard
Tuesday, March 07, 2017 ON THIS JOURNEY WE CALL OUR LIFE , James Hollis
Friday, March 03, 2017 DIVIDED SOUL, DIVIDED NATION, James Hollis
Wednesday, March 01, 2017 ENCOUNTERING DIVINE DARKNESS: The Book of Job and Jung's Answer to Job, Melanie Starr Costello
Saturday, December 03, 2016 SELF-FORGIVENESS, Julie Bondanza
Friday, December 02, 2016 SELF-BETRAYAL, Julie Bondanza
Saturday, November 19, 2016 WiseWomen's Forum: HER FATHER'S DAUGHTER
Friday, November 18, 2016 MEMORIES, DREAMS, REFLECTIONS OF CHILDHOOD, Bonnie Damron
Friday, November 11, 2016 FOR THOSE WHO MOURN: Moving Beyond Kubler-Ross to Current Perspectives on Dying and Grieving, Mary Ann Melpolder
Tuesday, November 01, 2016 C. G. JUNG'S AION: Researches into the Phenomenology of the Self CW9ii, Phyllis La Plante
Saturday, October 29, 2016 WiseWomen's Forum: THE 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION AND THE AMERICAN SHADOW
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 ON AUTHENTIC MOVEMENT, Joan Chodorow
Friday, October 14, 2016 LIVING MORE FULLY IN THE SHADOW OF MORTALITY, James Hollis
Friday, October 07, 2016 RECOVERING FROM TRAUMA: Resilience of Spirit, Barbara Barski-Carrow
Monday, October 03, 2016 ON DREAMS AND DEATH: A Jungian Interpretation by Marie-Louise Von Franz, led by April Barrett
Friday, September 30, 2016 FILM NIGHT: CARING FOR THE SOUL; An Introduction to Jungian Psychotherapy for Patients and Therapists, part 2, with Murray Stein
Saturday, September 24, 2016 WiseWomen's Forum: THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE FAMILIAR, Brenda Freeman
Friday, September 23, 2016 FILM NIGHT: CARING FOR THE SOUL; An Introduction to Jungian Psychotherapy for Patients and Therapists, part 1, with Murray Stein
Saturday, September 17, 2016 PLOTTING YOUR PERSONAL STORY: A Writing Retreat, Dennis Slattery
Friday, September 16, 2016 BEING CALLED TO CO-HEARANCE: Individuation and the Mythic Dimension, Dennis Slattery
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 MEMORIES, DREAMS, REFLECTIONS: An Introduction to the Life of Carl Jung , James Hollis
Friday, September 09, 2016 THE HUNGER FOR ATTACHMENT, Julie Bondanza
Thursday, September 08, 2016 THE BODY AND INDIVIDUATION: Physical Healing and Awareness, Tim Lyons
Wednesday, September 07, 2016 LOVE, SUFFERING, BETRAYAL: Works by Aldo Carotenuto on Passion and Individuation, Melanie Starr Costello
Tuesday, June 14, 2016 THE VISIONARY COMPANY: Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats
Friday, June 03, 2016 TO LIVE AGAIN! Jung Memorial Lecture, Guy Corneau
Friday, June 03, 2016 Jung Memorial Workshop, Guy Corneau- add description
Saturday, May 21, 2016 Wisewomen's Women's Discussion Group: WARRIOR GODS: Aggression- Perspectives from Myth and Science
Saturday, May 21, 2016 NARRATIVE INTELLIGENCE: Using the Power of Story to Transform What Happens
Friday, May 20, 2016 NARRATIVE INTELLIGENCE: Using the Power of Story to Transform what Happens
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 FILM NIGHT: DREAM INTERPRETATION: A Jungian Approach, part 2, with Murray Stein and John Hill
Friday, May 13, 2016 THE FAMILY TREE: A Lynching in Georgia, A Legacy of Secrets, and My Search for the Truth
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 FILM NIGHT: DREAM INTERPRETATION: A Jungian Approach, part 1, with Murray Stein and John Hill
Wednesday, May 04, 2016 FILM NIGHT: INDIVIDUATION: A Life-Long Journey with Murray Stein
Saturday, April 30, 2016 SEEKING THE OTHER, FINDING THE SELF: The Christ As A Model for Individuation
Thursday, April 28, 2016 JUNG AND THE EXPRESSIVE ARTS: HOW DID I GET HERE? A Personal Creation Myth
Saturday, April 23, 2016 Wisewomen's Women's Discussion Group: THE CALLING: Finding Your True Vocation Using Archetypal Astrology
Friday, April 22, 2016 PURSUING YOUR IMAGES: Active Imagination
Saturday, April 16, 2016 DISCERNING THE CURRENTS OF DESTINY: Personal and Archetypal Influences that Direct a Life
Friday, April 15, 2016 DISCERNING THE CURRENTS OF DESTINY: Personal and Archetypal Influences that Direct a Life
Monday, March 21, 2016 THE COMPLEX, NEUROSIS, AND TRAUMA IN FICTION AND DRAMA
Saturday, March 19, 2016 Wisewomen's Women's Discussion Group: THE I CHING AND THE COSMIC WAY: Our Bodies, Our Selves: Healing with the I Ching
Friday, March 18, 2016 FROM PYSCHE TO SCARAB: The Emotional Resonance of Animals in Symbolism and Synchronicity
Thursday, March 17, 2016 ALCHEMY: An Introduction to the Symbolism and the Psychology by Marie-Louise Von Franz, part 2, April Barrett
Wednesday, March 16, 2016 TANGLED IN "NOTS": Working With Complexes Using Active Imagination
Tuesday, March 15, 2016 THE MOON AND ITS PHASES: The Mind's Cyclic Journey From the Branches to the Roots of the Tree of Life
Monday, March 14, 2016 PSYCHE AND SUBSTANCE: Homeopathy and Depth Psychology
Tuesday, February 16, 2016 MYTHOLOGEMS: Incarnations of an Invisible World
Saturday, December 05, 2015 SHAKESPEARE AND ARCHETYPES: Or How Shakespeare Became American! Workshop
Friday, December 04, 2015 SHAKESPEARE AND ARCHETYPES: Or How Shakespeare Became American! Lecture
Saturday, November 21, 2015 Wisewomen's Women's Discussion Group: USING ARCHETYPAL ASTROLOGY IN THE REAL WORLD
Friday, November 20, 2015 UNDER SATURN'S SHADOW: The Wounding and Healing of Men
Friday, November 13, 2015 MUSIC: Medicine for the Soul
Saturday, November 07, 2015 THE GODS AT PLAY: Archetypal Powers and Patterns in the Arts
Friday, November 06, 2015 JAMES HILLMAN AND THE RETURN OF SOUL: Reflections on His Thought and Legacy
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 RELIGIOUS IDEAS IN ALCHEMY
Friday, October 23, 2015 THE ARCHETYPAL PATTERN OF THE WOUNDED HEALER: A Repeat Seminar For Professional Caregivers of All Kinds
Saturday, October 17, 2015 Wisewomen's Women's Discussion Group: ONCE UPON A LOSS: A NEW LOOK AT CINDERELLA
Friday, October 16, 2015 JUST BECAUSE IT DIDN'T HAPPEN . . .
Tuesday, October 06, 2015 DARK SELVES: Shadow Encounters in Personal and Public Life
Saturday, October 03, 2015 CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER: PLOTTING YOUR PERSONAL STORY: A Writing Retreat
Friday, October 02, 2015 CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER: BEING CALLED TO CO-HEARANCE: Individuation and the Mythic Dimension
Saturday, September 26, 2015 TRANSFORMING TRAUMA THROUGH MYTH AND IMAGE: From African Village to American Inner City
Friday, September 25, 2015 HELEN LUKE: A Sense of the Sacred
Monday, September 21, 2015 MYSTIC HEART, SACRED EARTH
Saturday, September 19, 2015 Wisewomen's Women's Discussion Group: TOOLS AND TASKS OF THE SECOND HALF OF LIFE
Monday, September 14, 2015 THE ARCHETYPE OF TRAGEDY: Modern Re-tellings of Fairy and Folk Tales in Literature and Film
Saturday, September 12, 2015 MIRRORS TO THE SOUL: Dreamwork as a Dialectical Process
Wednesday, September 09, 2015 ALCHEMY: An Introduction to the Symbolism and the Psychology by M.-L. von Franz
Saturday, June 06, 2015 CULTURAL ATTITUDES, John Beebe
Friday, June 05, 2015 CULTURAL ATTITUDES, John Beebe
Saturday, May 23, 2015 Wisewomen's Women's Discussion Group
Saturday, May 16, 2015 PAINFUL EMOTIONS: A Depth-Psychological Approach, Lionell Corbett
Friday, May 15, 2015 THE SOUL IN ANGUISH: Psychological and Spiritual Approaches to Suffering, Lionell Corbett
Friday, May 08, 2015 PICTURING MARY: Woman, Mother, Idea, Julie Bonanza
Tuesday, May 05, 2015 THE MYSTIC Mythology and Poetry of the Sacred Marriage: Hierosgamos and the Marriage Archetype, Bonnie Damron
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 ALCHEMICAL ACTIVE IMAGINATION, Marie-Louise Von Franz, April Barrett
Thursday, April 23, 2015 PERSONAL MYTH AND FAIRYTALE: A Jungian Experience, Sondra Geller
Friday, April 17, 2015 WRITING TO WHOLENESS, Susan Tiberghien
Saturday, April 11, 2015 DREAMS AND THE ECLIPSE OF GOD: How Personal Complexes and Personal Meaning Often Silence the Archetypal Message in Dreams and Life, Michael Conforti
Friday, April 10, 2015 DREAMS AND THE ECLIPSE OF GOD: How Personal Complexes and Personal Meaning Often Silence the Archetypal Message in Dreams and Life, Michael Conforti
Saturday, March 21, 2015 Wisewomen's Women's Discussion Group
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 THE MYSTIC HEART, Melanie Starr Costello
Friday, March 13, 2015 THE ARCHETYPAL PATTERN OF THE WOUNDED HEALER
Thursday, March 12, 2015 ACTIVE IMAGINATION, DREAM YOGA, AND SLEEP YOGA: Paths to Individuation, Liberation, and Enlightenment, Tim Lyons
Tuesday, March 10, 2015 MYTHS TO LIVE BY: Lectures by Joseph Campbell, James Hollis
Tuesday, March 10, 2015 VENUS AND NEPTUNE: The Mapped and the Unmapped Emotional Domains, Heidi Lindemann and Michael Perry