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Programs 

"I'm always excited by the materials the Faculty of the Jung Society chooses for the programs whether it's poetry, literature, drama, philosophy, meditation, or expressive arts."
- Jung Society Program Participant

“Thank you for your wonderful programs. The Jung Society has never been more vibrant!”
– Giuliana Reed

    • Monday, March 12, 2018
    • Monday, May 07, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register
    Course

    Synchronicity holds both magic and mystery when it is encountered.  It seems puzzling and unexplainable.  Perhaps we could say that synchronicity is a meaningful coincidence that connects something going on outside us with something happening inside us.  Jung describes synchronicity not as cause and effect but as consisting of an unconscious image that comes into consciousness and an objective situation coinciding with this content and creating emotion and affect. The purpose of this five-week course is to allow opportunities to be self-reflective and open to the possibility of synchronicity, which brings consciousness and meaning to our lives with the opportunity for change.  We will be reading and working with David Richo’s book, The Power of Coincidence: How Life Shows Us What We Need to Know.    

    Rosanne Shepler is a Licensed Professional Counselor and Licensed Psychoanalyst who received her Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute of New York in 2002.  She also holds masters degrees in Health Education and Counseling.  She is a past president of JAWA and a past treasurer of both JAWA and NYAAP.  She is on the Curriculum Committee and Teaching Faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York.  She’s a member of JAWA, the New York Association for Analytical Psychology (NYAAP), the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts (IRSJA), and the International Association of Analytical Psychology (IAAP). 

    • Monday, March 19, 2018
    • Monday, May 14, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register


    Book Exploration Course
    We will read and discuss the following five novels:  The End of the Affair by Graham Greene; Lying Awake by Mark Salzman; The Painted Veil by Somerset Maugham; Abide with Me by Elizabeth Strout, and The Fire Sermon by Jamie Quatro.

    Julie Bondanza, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and a diplomate Jungian analyst who trained at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she was Director of Training, a job she also held with the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts. She has taught extensively in New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Washington, as well as for various Jung societies across the country. Presently she serves the board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York and continues to serve as its program chair, a post she has held for many years. Dr. Bondanza practices in Takoma Park and lives in Washington, D.C.

    • Wednesday, April 18, 2018
    • Wednesday, May 30, 2018
    • 6 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 4
    Register

    Course

    “It may be said that round the material contained in this volume the major portion of his later work revolves” (ed. note, first edition).

    Jung spent the last third of his life studying and writing about alchemy.  Volume 12 of his Collected Works, Psychology and Alchemy, is one of his most influential works.   This book serves as C.G. Jung’s introduction of alchemy to his readers and illustrates that, from the beginning, alchemy had a dual nature: chemical work on one hand and a psychological process on the other.

    This course will cover Part I, “Introduction to the Religious and Psychological Problems of Alchemy,” and Part III, “Religious Ideas in Alchemy,” chapters 1-4.  Part I is a study of the relationship between alchemy and the psychic process of individuation.  Part III is a survey of the basic concepts of alchemy, including the alchemical process and its stages, the conceptions and symbols of the goal, the nature of the prima materia and the hidden treasure within this dark matter.  Additionally, the work of redemption is viewed from the perspectives of both the Christian Church and that of alchemy; the symbolism and language of the Mass is discussed.

    The format of this course is class discussion based on the readings.  For the first class, please read Part 1, “Introduction to the Religious and Psychological Problems of Alchemy,” (pp. 1-37).

    Cathryn Polonchak is a certified Jungian Analyst and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of West Virginia.  She has a private practice in the Shepherdstown and the Charles Town/Harpers Ferry areas of West Virginia.  In addition to her membership in JAWA, Cathryn is a member of the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts (PAJA), the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts (IRSJA), the International Association of Analytical Psychology (IAAP), and the National Association of social Workers (NASW).  She was the past Director of Seminar for PAJA.  She is interested in the interface between body and mind, particularly at the psyche-soma level of trauma.

    • Saturday, April 28, 2018
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 17
    Register

    Discussion Group

    The Magdalene Mysteries relate both to ‘hidden’ histories and Gnostic Texts concerning Mary Magdalene and Jesus, and to the Tradition of the Blue Rose, the name given to MM’s teachings, and a lineage of Grail Priestesses and Womb Shamans whose central symbol is the Chalice of the Grail, and whose guiding force is the Cosmic Sophia.  MM has a strong presence throughout France, particularly in Provence, and in the Languedoc where the Cathar Gnostic Movement – devotees of MM and Jesus – also flourished.  

    On April 28th, Marie Saeger and Robin Rausch will talk about their experiences on a pilgrimage last fall to the Languedoc, France and Catalonia, Spain where they visited some of the sites sacred to these traditions. 

    Marie Saeger is among the earliest participants in the Wisewoman group.  Marie is from Toledo, Ohio and has lived in Germany, Spain, and Paraguay.  She has also traveled in Europe, the Middle East, South America, and Asia.  She has worked as a teacher, travel agent, Red Cross case worker, Peace Corps volunteer, and computer programmer analyst.  She is retired and lives in Silver Spring, MD.

    Robin Rausch is also among the Wisewoman group’s earliest members.  Her interest in things Jungian dates from a class in religious myth and symbolism that she took in undergraduate school.  She holds degrees in music and library science and is currently the head of Reader Services in the Music Division at the Library of Congress.

    Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.
    • Tuesday, May 01, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    Film Night: PSYCHOLOGY AND RELIGION, Jung's Argument with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Thursday, May 03, 2018
    • Thursday, May 31, 2018
    • 4 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 0
    Join waitlist
    Course

    We will revisit the first stories we remember hearing. Where did we hear them? Were they read to us or did we read them ourselves? What were they about?

    In this class for 10-12 people we will use pastels, tissue paper collage, clay and journaling to explore the meaning of story. How does exposure to early stories influence our development?  Where do they show up later in life, sometimes as life scripts or personal myths and fairytales?

    This workshop will be playful, creative and personally informative. Participants will come to see how their unique versions of even classic stories

    become sign posts on their journey of individuation. In the process we will witness each other and be witnessed in a safe space. The place Jung described as the temenos.

    Join me, Sandy Geller, with your stories in the month of May 2018.

    Sondra Geller, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, is a Jungian Analyst, Board Certified Registered Art Therapist, and Licensed Professional Counselor.  She has a private practice in Washington, D.C., where she sees clients individually and in groups. Her work reflects a synthesis of the principals of both Jungian Analytic Psychology and Art Therapy.  Sandy also teaches and presents experiential workshops focusing on the dynamics of making art in the presence of the analyst.  What happens in the silent space between client/artist and Jungian analyst/observer, and how does this dynamic facilitate the journey of individuation? 
    • Friday, May 04, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Sanctuary of the Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register

    Lecture 

    The attainment of wholeness requires one to stake one’s whole being.  Nothing less will do. 
    - C.G. Jung

    How has the concept of wholeness been perceived throughout the centuries?  How did Jung answer the longing for wholeness?  How do we answer?  With excerpts from Jung’s The Red Book: Liber Novus and Memories, Dreams, Reflections, along with excerpts from Thomas Merton, Annie Dillard, and Orhan Pamuk, we will consider different ways to wholeness, from journaling and active imagination to the quiet practice of Zen.  In bringing the pieces together – within ourselves and within the world around us ­– we will uncover our essential oneness. 

    Susan Tiberghien, an American writer living in Geneva, Switzerland, has published three memoirs: Looking for Gold, Circling to the Center, Footsteps-A European Album, and the highly appreciated writing book,  One Year to a Writing Life, plus two new titles published in 2015: Side by Side: Writing Your Love Story and Footsteps:  In Love with a Frenchman.  Her most recent book, Writing Toward Wholeness, Lessons Inspired by C.G.Jung was published March 1 by Chiron Publications. She has been teaching writing workshops for close to twenty years at C.G. Jung Centers, at the International Women’s Writing Guild, and at writers’ centers and conferences in the States and in Europe where she directs the Geneva Writers’ Group, an association of 250 English-language writers.
    Find her at www.susantiberghien.com

    • Saturday, May 05, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, N.W., Washington D.C. 20016
    • 7
    Register

    A Day with...

    How has the concept of wholeness been perceived through the centuries? How did Jung answer the longing for wholeness? How do we answer?  In the morning we will consider the practice of journaling, of keeping our own Red Books. We will write journal entries which address our desire for wholeness. We will then look for related images and pursue them in active imagination, writing dialogues and drawing them. We will consider the mandala as a central symbol of wholeness.  In the afternoon we will examine the practice of Zen, of clear seeing and clear writing. What we see clearly, we write clearly. In doing away with distractions, we will uncover our essential oneness. In writing, we will become “whole-makers”.

    Susan Tiberghien, an American writer living in Geneva, Switzerland, has published three memoirs: Looking for Gold, Circling to the Center, Footsteps-A European Album, and the highly appreciated writing book,  One Year to a Writing Life, plus two new titles published in 2015: Side by Side: Writing Your Love Story and Footsteps:  In Love with a Frenchman.  Her most recent book, Writing Toward Wholeness, Lessons Inspired by C.G.Jung was published March 1 by Chiron Publications. She has been teaching writing workshops for close to twenty years at C.G. Jung Centers, at the International Women’s Writing Guild, and at writers’ centers and conferences in the States and in Europe where she directs the Geneva Writers’ Group, an association of 250 English-language writers.
    Find her at www.susantiberghien.com

    • Tuesday, May 08, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 5
    Register

    Film Night: JUNG ON CHRISTIANITY, with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.


    • Friday, May 11, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 6
    Register

    An Evening With....

     For this evening presentation, Carolyn will explore convergences in the definitions of psychological illness and healing between Carl Jung and the great intellectual and founder of modern Chinese literature, Lu Xun (1881-1936).  Carl Jung (1875-1961) and Lu Xun were contemporaries, living on opposite sides of the world but embedded in the same international zeitgeist, as emerging European thinking about the unconscious trickled into China during the early 20th C. As a young man studying in Japan, Lu Xun committed himself to healing the spirits of the Chinese people with literature. His model of spiritual healing, implicit within the structures of his short stories, closely parallels Jung’s views on the relationship of ego and shadow within the whole Self. Lu Xun’s short stories give renewed meaning to Jung’s 1916 statement that “the psychology of the individual is reflected in the psychology of the nation.” These parallels are the subject of the evening’s presentation.

    It is difficult to exaggerate Lu Xun importance in 20th C. China. Critical commentary on his works (which include not only short stories but also essays, commentaries, translations, and poetry) would fill a small library; until recently his stories were required reading in Chinese schools; his short stories have been widely presented to popular audiences through films, operas, plays, paintings, prints and other media; several museums are dedicated to his life. He is best known as a truth-teller, an unrelenting critic of the Confucian society of his time, which he understood as visiting gratuitous suffering on the Chinese people. He revealed age-old, unquestioned social norms to be instruments of cruelty. His reputation is so powerful that it has been appropriated by parties from opposite sides of the political spectrum: on the one hand, he was praised effusively by Chairman Mao Tse-tung (1893-1974) as a harbinger of the Communist revolution; on the other there is currently a commercial Lu Xun theme park in Beijing.

    But these public encomiums belie the exquisite sensitivity of this extraordinary writer of short stories, who probed the depths of his own psyche and unflinchingly challenged his own moral complicity in the systems he critiqued. Lu Xun’s work as a writer of the modern short story and Jung’s writing and work arising from the treatment room converge in their premises about the healing capacity of the psyche; both explore how the unconscious can be brought into consciousness as a path towards greater wholeness, both within the individual and within the body politic.

    Carolyn will begin by sketching the historical context from which these two great thinkers emerged, provide summary definitions of Jung’s notion of the dynamic interplay of conscious and unconscious within the whole Self, and then focus on key images from Lu Xun’s autobiographical statement about his choice of a career in literature and on his shortest short story. Jung’s psychological model illuminates Lu Xun’s artistic vision of social healing and suggests that beneath the layers of cultural difference certain human patterns stubbornly prevail. The evening’s discussion is based on my new book Reading Lu Xun Through Carl Jung.

    Carolyn Thompson Brown is retired from her position as Director of the Office of Scholarly Programs and the John W. Kluge Center of the Library of Congress. She holds a Ph. D. in Literature from American University and an MA and BA from Cornell University in Chinese Literature and Asian Studies, respectively. She served as Associate Dean for Humanities at Howard University before moving to the Library of Congress, where she held numerous positions including Director of Area Studies Collections and Director of Collections and Services. During her academic career she published in several journals, including CLEAR and Modern Chinese Literature and edited Psycho-Sinology: the Universe of Dreams in Chinese Culture. She currently serves as a trustee of the Fetzer Institute, Kalamazoo, Michigan.

    • Tuesday, May 15, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 5
    Register

    Film Night: JUNG ON EASTERN RELIGIONS, with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Saturday, May 19, 2018
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 18
    Register

    Discussion Group

    On May 19th, Dianne Mouchon Rhodes, will lead a presentation on hypnosis. She will begin with an introductory talk about hypnosis in general and how Carl Jung used hypnosis.  Then she will lead a guided hypnotic visualization centered on women’s self-empowerment and self-love and connecting to our inner spiritual guidance.  Dianne’s presentation will be followed by a Q&A Discussion. 

    Dianne Mouchon Rhodes is a Certified Consulting Hypnosis Therapist and Projective Dreamworker. Dianne has been helping people to create positive behavior changes with the use of hypnosis therapy for four years. Certified through Jeremy Taylor’s MIPD Certificate Program, Dianne also facilitates dream groups and experiential dreamwork workshops and offers individual dream interpretation.  You can find out more about Dianne and her services at www.dreamyourinnerhorizons.com.  

    Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.

    • Saturday, May 19, 2018
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 21
    Register

    Discussion Group

    On May 19th, Dianne Mouchon Rhodes, will lead a presentation on hypnosis. She will begin with an introductory talk about hypnosis in general and how Carl Jung used hypnosis.  Then she will lead a guided hypnotic visualization centered on women’s self-empowerment and self-love and connecting to our inner spiritual guidance.  Dianne’s presentation will be followed by a Q&A Discussion. 

    Dianne Mouchon Rhodes is a Certified Consulting Hypnosis Therapist and Projective Dreamworker. Dianne has been helping people to create positive behavior changes with the use of hypnosis therapy for four years. Certified through Jeremy Taylor’s MIPD Certificate Program, Dianne also facilitates dream groups and experiential dreamwork workshops and offers individual dream interpretation.  You can find out more about Dianne and her services at www.dreamyourinnerhorizons.com.  

    Logistics: Please arrive early so the session can begin promptly at 2:00. The doors open at 1:30 so participants can have an opportunity to meet & greet before the session. Please use the Hawthorne Place entrance. The Jung Society has moved an on-line registration and to Paypal, so please register and pay on line. If there are problems with registering on line, please bring $5.00 cash or check.


    • Tuesday, May 22, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 6
    Register

    Film Night:  JUNG ON THE JEWISH MYSTICAL TRADITION with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.


    • Tuesday, May 29, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 8
    Register

    Film Night: JUNG ON THE BIBLE: THE ANSWER TO JOB with Murray Stein and Tony Woolfson

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Friday, June 01, 2018
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016


    To join a waitlist for the 2018-19 academic year of the Jungian Studies Reading Seminar, please email James Hollis at Archaeon@AOL.com 
    Put into your email subject line:
    Jungian Studies 2018-19, Your Full Name
    Applications will be accepted starting June 1, 2018
    Registration will be upon acceptance to the program.

    The Jung Society of Washington Jungian Studies Reading Seminar includes eight monthly seminars offered per year to read and discuss predominantly classical Jung and other figures who link directly to the classical Jungian corpus.

    The Fall/Spring semesters of 2017-18, Jungian analysts are teaching celebrated works by Erich Neumann, James Hillman, Marie-Louise von Franz, Emma Jung, Edward Edinger, and Marian Woodman.

    While some of the prior members of the Jung Studies Reading Seminar will be continuing with the program in 2018-19, the Jung Society will open up participation to new members for the next academic year program.

    Participation is open to anyone, regardless of background, who wishes to learn the theory and practice of depth psychology from some of its great teachers.

    The seminar meets one Saturday per month from 9 to 4:30 during the months September through December and February through May. The participant is obliged only to read the texts and come prepared for discussion conducted by the analyst. 

    Anyone interested in applying should direct their questions or applications to James Hollis at Archaeon@AOL.com.

    This year the program is graciously underwritten in part by the Prometheus Foundation

    Tuition $800 per semester, $1600 per year. 

    At the end of the two year cycle, a certificate of completion will be conferred.


    • Friday, June 01, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Butler Boardroom, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register

    Lecture

    For the last 30 years, I have been writing about a sophisticated inner system of archetypal defenses (known as the “self-care system”), which forms what I believe to be a core complex of the traumatized psyche (see Blake Painting of ‘The Good and Evil Angels Fighting for Possession of a Child’).  The purpose of this inner structure (witnessed in both mythology and dreams) seems to be to dissociate, protect, and defend a sacred, innocent core of en-souled selfhood from further violation by experience. Unfortunately, such protection is obtained at a very high cost, because by protecting and sequestering the lost heart of the self, the dissociative defenses also cut it off from conscious feeling and hence from life.  Psychotherapy, therefore, often becomes a battle between life- and anti-life forces on behalf of the soul.

    In this slide-illustrated lecture, Dr. Kalsched will present both ancient and contemporary imagery of this core complex and its role in both protecting and persecuting the orphaned soul of the trauma survivor. Clinical vignettes will illustrate the process through which the lost soul is contacted and invited into relationship.

    Donald E. Kalsched, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and clinical psychologist with a private practice in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  He is a member of the C.G. Jung Institute of Santa Fe, a senior faculty member and supervisor with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts, and lectures nationally and internationally pursuing his inter-disciplinary interest in early trauma and dissociation.  He is the author of numerous articles and two major books, The Inner World of Trauma: Archetypal Defenses of the Personal Spirit, (Routledge, 1996) and his recent Trauma and the Soul: A Psycho-spiritual Approach to Human Development and its Interruption (Routledge, 2013).  His latest book explores how psychotherapeutic work with trauma survivors sometimes provides unexpected access to an ineffable world of soul and spirit.

    Directions to the Butler Boardroom at the American University here.


    • Saturday, June 02, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • The Butler Boardroom, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register

    Workshop

    According to C.G. Jung, the human personality contains a vital spark or sacred core of aliveness (soul) that must personalize and embody in the course of a person’s development if optimal psychological health and ensouled living is to become possible.  But when trauma strikes the developing psyche of a child, a dissociation or split occurs in which the vital core of the self (often represented as a ‘child’) retreats into the unconscious where it continues to live in “suspended animation” under a spell cast by the powers of the psyche’s survival system.  Depth Psychotherapy offers the opportunity for renewed contact with this orphaned child and hence for renewed feeling-life, creativity, and relatedness—but not without fierce resistance thrown up by the psyche’s defensive powers.

    In this slide-illustrated lecture and workshop, we will explore this archetypal struggle with the help of clinical examples, dreams, and mythological amplifications.  New findings in attachment theory, affective neuroscience and somatically attuned ways of working in the psychotherapy process, will be discussed.

    Donald E. Kalsched, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and clinical psychologist with a private practice in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  He is a member of the C.G. Jung Institute of Santa Fe, a senior faculty member and supervisor with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts, and lectures nationally and internationally pursuing his inter-disciplinary interest in early trauma and dissociation.  He is the author of numerous articles and two major books, The Inner World of Trauma: Archetypal Defenses of the Personal Spirit, (Routledge, 1996) and his recent Trauma and the Soul: A Psycho-spiritual Approach to Human Development and its Interruption (Routledge, 2013).  His latest book explores how psychotherapeutic work with trauma survivors sometimes provides unexpected access to an ineffable world of soul and spirit.

    Directions to the Butler Boardroom at the American University here.


Please read before you register

The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit educational institution. Although many of the Jung Society's programs involve analytical psychology and allied subjects, these offerings are intended, and should be viewed, as a source of information and education, and not as therapy. The Jung Society does not offer psychoanalytical or other mental health services.

Cancellation Policy: Registration for Jung Society of Washington events may be canceled with a full refund until one week before the event's date. Thereafter, refunds are not available.

Please refrain from wearing intense perfumes and other fragrances when you attend our programs as some people may be sensitive to them. We thank you in advance.

OUR MISSION
The Jung Society of Washington brings the general public and professional community the insights and tools of analytic psychology and related disciplines. Through programs, classes, visiting speakers, partnerships with like organizations, and digital media, the Jung Society creates a platform for communal discussion regarding the personal and cultural issues that confront us. The tools these programs provide assist individuals, relationships, and societies in a dialogue that enhances understanding the unconscious dynamics that course through personal lives, cultural problems, and historic patterns.

JUNG SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON
5200 Cathedral Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20016
CALL: 202-237-8109
EMAIL: jungsociety@jung.org

OFFICE & LIBRARY HOURS:
Weekdays: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

DIRECTIONS
BY CAR: From MacArthur Blvd., turn east (away from the Potomac River) onto Cathedral at the light between Loughboro and Arizona.

BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT: D6 bus line.
Parking is available in the streets.
Entrance to the Jung Society library and office is from the side street, Hawthorne Place.


The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit educational institution. Although many of the Jung Society's programs involve analytical psychology and allied subjects, these offerings are intended, and should be viewed, as a source of information and education, and not as therapy. The Jung Society does not offer psychoanalytical or other mental health services.
Images of mandalas throughout this site were created by Carl Jung's patients between the years 1926 and 1945.

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