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Programs 

“Thank you for your wonderful programs. The Jung Society has never been more vibrant!”

– Giuliana Reed

Cancellation Policy

We require at least seven days notice prior to the first class meeting or event to cancel a registration with a full refund. We do not pro-rate courses. Occasionally a small program is in danger of cancellation due to insufficient registration, so if you’re planning to come, please register. 

    • Tuesday, September 04, 2018
    • Tuesday, September 25, 2018
    • 4 sessions
    • The Sanctuary Room, Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016
    Register

    Course

    When Jung asked the question, “Where did the gods go when they left Olympus,” he answered, they left Olympus and entered the unconscious of the modern and became “disturbances.” When Jung talks of “the gods” he sees them as the personification of archetypal energies. Those forces are timeless and course through all of us, so when a god “dies” it means the energy has left the concept, practice, ritual, dogma, gone underground, and, incognito, appears elsewhere.  How do we, then, track those energies, and where do they reappear in such contemporary forms as consumerism, seduction by electronics, sociopathies, and personal symptoms? This class will explore how today’s culture copes with, or finds surrogates for the primal powers of nature, however disguised they are in contemporary cultural expressions. 

    Reading: James Hollis, Tracking the Gods: the Place of Myth in Modern Life

    James Hollis, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Washington, D.C., Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington, and author of fifteen books.
    • Friday, September 07, 2018
    • Friday, October 05, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 0
    Join waitlist
    Course

    SOMETHING NEW AT THE JUNG SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON
    COME TO FIVE FRIDAY MORNING CLASSES

    The classes will demonstrate fundamental ways for using the expressive arts within the context of Jungian studies, especially for analysis and therapy. Participants will have an opportunity to experience a scribble drawing, a clay scribble, dream drawing, self expression through gesture and the use of stories to enter into dialogue with the unconscious and become familiar with what Jung called the symbolic attitude of the psyche.

    Students of Jung often report that the art making process enables them to go deeper into the journey of self-discovery than just words alone.  Even dream work can be enriched with simple drawings or sculptures.

    Simple, playful drawings can reveal aspects of one’s self that might otherwise remain hidden.  Recovering lost parts of self can be experienced as transformational.

    Whether you are engaged in your own analysis or are an interested student of Jung eager to deepen your relationship with psyche, taking part in an experiential class promises to be a rewarding experience of Jung.

    Sandy Geller, is a Jungian Analyst, a Board Certified Art Therapist and a Licensed Professional Counselor. She has extensive experience in Dance Movement Therapy and has worked collaboratively with Music, Poetry, and Drama therapists. She works with individuals of all ages either one on one or in groups to help them unblock their creative potential and discover their life’s purpose. She has especially focused on work with older adults, inspiring play writes, painters and poets to push through their blocks and bring their works to fruition.

    As Jung himself reported, every time he came up against a brick wall or found himself stuck he reached for his art materials or carved stone to find his way back to a connection with the unconscious and renew his dialogue with psyche.

    In addition, her one on one work with clients focuses on issues from attachment and early developmental issues across the life span to individuation.

    She is in private practice in NW Washington, DC.  She teaches for the Washington Jung Society, the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts and is a guest presenter for the GWU Graduate Art Therapy Program.

    Sgeller5@verizon.net
    Sondrageller.com

    For Beginning Students of Jung as well as Advanced.
    Register early. Class size is limited. 

    • Friday, September 07, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 5
    Register

    Film Night: SIX ON SHADOW: What is Evil?

    Tonight’s film with Murray Stein is an introduction with “general considerations” from the writings of Jung and Neumann, including the problem of projection, scapegoating, and the value of evil and the shadow.

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Saturday, September 08, 2018
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register


    The Jung Society of Washington Jungian Studies Reading Seminar includes eight monthly seminars offered per year to read and discuss The Collected Works of Carl Jung.

    While some of the prior members of the Jung Studies Reading Seminar will be continuing with the program in 2018-19, the Jung Society opens up participation to new members for the next academic year program.

    Participation is open to anyone, regardless of background, who wishes to learn the theory and practice of depth psychology from some of its great teachers. 

    The seminar meets one Saturday per month from 9 to 4:30 during the months September through December and February through May. The participant is obliged only to read the texts and come prepared for discussion conducted by the analyst. 

    Anyone who is interested, please submit a one page letter of interest (with an introduction of yourself and your interest in Jung) and a resume to Radhika at radhika@jung.org.
    Put into your email subject line:
    Jungian Studies 2018-19, Your Full Name

    Dates: Sept 8, Oct 13, Nov 10, Dec 8, Feb 9, March 9, April 13, May 11

    September 8, 2018

    Memories, Dreams, Reflections

    Anne Pickup

    October 13, 2018

    November 10, 2018

    Collected Works, Volume 9.1

    Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious

    Julie Bondanza

    December 8, 2018

    Collected Works, Volume 8

    The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche

    Janice Quinn

    February 9, 2019

    Collected Works, Volume 5,

    Symbols of Transformation

    James Hollis

    March 9, 2019

    Collected Works, Volume 11

    Psychology and Religion: West and East

    Starr Costello

    April 13, 2019

    May 11, 2019

    Collected Works, Volume 12

    Psychology and Alchemy

    Cathryn Polonchak


    Tuition $800 per semester, $1600 per year. 

    At the end of the two year cycle, a certificate of completion will be conferred. (you need to attend at least 6 out of 8 sessions per year)

    Applications are accepted starting June 1, 2018
    Registration will be upon acceptance to the program.

    • Monday, September 10, 2018
    • Monday, November 05, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016
    • 8
    Register

    Course

    C. G. Jung believed that the Grail quest revealed the divided soul of our time and its path to radical renewal and healing. We shall explore this story and its rich symbols in order to be touched by its sources of transformation. In learning about this myth in an experiential way, we shall learn about our own sacred journey.

    From T. S. Eliot to film, the Grail legend has continued to stir the psyche and inspire. A king is sick. A once-fertile country is turned into a wasteland. A Grail holds the promise for healing. As a source text, we shall use the classic work by Emma Jung and Marie-Louise von Franz, The Grail Legend. Added to this shall be an array of poets, including T. S. Eliot and Ted Hughes. Our Grail round table will have an invitation to some reading, though all that is required is to show up with a willingness to learn the questions of the quest.

    Mark Napack, M.A., S.T.L., M.S., first studied the Grail legend as a student of comparative literature at Columbia University. From there, he went on to study Jung, psychology and the history of religion at Fordham, Loyola and Catholic Universities, from which he received various graduate degrees. A long-time teacher and presenter, Mark has a special concern for areas of psychology and spirituality and an ongoing involvement with the Collected Works of Jung and Jungian classics. He has presented at international conferences and published in scholarly publications. Mark Napack, LCPC is also a Jungian informed psychotherapist in North Bethesda, MD.

    • Wednesday, September 12, 2018
    • Wednesday, October 10, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 8
    Register

    Book Exploration Course

    From the Back Matter: [In] possibly the best one-volume English-language summary of Jung's thought . . . , Murray Stein develops the cartographical metaphor of the title by beginning with the "surface" (ego) of the psyche and exploring successively more complex areas, including complexes, libido theory, shadow, anima/animus the Self, individuation, and synchronicity. The map soon resembles the multidisciplinary chart of a solar system more than it does a flat map. In each subject area, Stein draws heavily on papers that Jung wrote late in his life, but he sets these in the context of Jung's earlier developing thought. This method allows the author to demonstrate the interconnectedness and coherence of Jung's mature work. 

    Text: Jung’s Map of the Soul by Murray Stein

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Friday, September 14, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 10
    Register

    Film Night: SIX ON SHADOW: Criminal Mind

    Tonight’s film with Sarah Stein and Murray Stein discusses the criminal mind and criminality in society; states of possession by evil; rebellion, envy, classism, racism, and fundamentalism.


    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.


    • Monday, September 17, 2018
    • Monday, November 12, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register
    Course

    What does it mean to have authority?  A discussion based on the reading of the following works of literature: Circe by Madeline Miller; Richard III by Shakespeare; Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck; Antigone by Sophocles and Fiddler on the Roof.


    Julie Bondanza, Ph.D.,
    is a licensed psychologist and a diplomate Jungian analyst who trained at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she was Director of Training, a job she also held with the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts. She has taught extensively in New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Washington, as well as for various Jung societies across the country. Presently she serves the board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York and continues to serve as its program chair, a post she has held for many years. Dr. Bondanza practices in Takoma Park and lives in Washington, D.C.

    • Friday, September 21, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 14
    Register

    An Evening with...

    The Greek word xenos translates into English as stranger. The custom of inviting the stranger in is xenia, also the ancient Greek word for hospitality. In the ancient world, and in particular the world of the Greek storyteller, Homer, xeniawas divine law sent directly from Olympos, and Zeus Xenios was the guardian of strangers, supplicants, the homeless, widows and orphans.  Today, the modern Greek word for hospitality is philosxenia, love for the stranger, care of the guest.

    According to many ancient traditions, when a homeless or destitute person arrived at your door, you invited her or him in, and offered comfort, food, a place at the table, a bath, and comfortable bed in which to sleep.  If you refused hospitality, or violated this sacred code, you could bring the wrath of God down upon you and your household.  To invite the stranger in, your generosity could bring bounty and honor upon your house and home. 

    We have a storehouse of such stories.  The BiblicalBook of Ruth, “Baucis and Philemon” from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, James Russell Lowell’s poem, “The Vision of Sir Launfal,” and Homer’s Odyssey are some well known examples.

    After your guest was made welcome, you might ask personal questions, such as, “Who are your people?  Where are you from? What is your name?”  Then, if you were lucky, your guest might entertain you with stories and valuable information about the affairs of the world beyond your little island home.  Or perhaps this guest-stranger might even share a dream with you.

    Tonight we will reflect on some of the stories that come to us from the world’s great traditions, like the ones named above, and allow them to touch us as they will. Then each one of us will have a chance to discover where a beggar or stranger may be knocking at the doorway of our souls.

    Bonnie L. Damron, PhD, LCSW is a psychotherapist, ethnographer, storyteller, and Archetypal Pattern Analyst in private practice in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. During her thirty-four years in practice, she has conducted seminars on archetypal motifs in fairy tales, myths, the arts, and the writings of C.G. Jung. She also leads study tours to Crete and the Greek mainland. Dr. Damron holds a Masters of Social Work degree from Catholic University, a Doctoral Degree in American Culture Studies from the University of Maryland, and a Certificate as an Archetypal Pattern Analyst from the Assisi Institute for Archetypal Studies.

    • Saturday, September 22, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 14
    Register
    A Day with...

    Today, as we continue to explore “The Stranger at the Door,” we will focus our attention inward and ask, “What is the relationship between the stranger at the door, and my inner life? “  How do I proceed?

    Fortunately,Jung draws a straight line for us from theological and mythological considerations about this archetype directly to psychology, to psyche, and the individuation process.

    In Psychotherapists or Clergy, he wrote, "Perhaps this sounds very simple, but simple things are always the most difficult.  In actual life it requires the greatest art to be simple, and so acceptance of oneself is the essence of the moral problem and the acid test of one’s whole outlook on life.  That I feed the beggar, that I forgive an insult, that I love my enemy in the name of Christ—all these are undoubtedly great virtues. What I do unto the least of my brethren, that I do unto Christ.  But what if I should discover that the least amongst them all, the poorest of all beggars, the most impudent of all offenders yea the very fiend himself—that these are within me, and that I myself stand in need of the alms of my own kindness, that I myself am the enemy who must be loved—what then? (Vol. 11 of the Collected Works: page 330, ¶520).

    Taking Jung’s lead, let’s consider the possibility that, at least in part, I have within me elements of my own life that are strangers to me, and in need of care and recognition.  This is a hard problem!  As Dr. Jung says, “…simple things are always the most difficult.”

    I could start with my dreams.  What if I think of my dream as a stranger, or beggar, or supplicant arriving at my door?  Do I greet my dreams, and shadow-selves, in the way the ancients greeted a stranger at the door, with xenios—invite them in and offer them kindness and hospitality? This could be a scary thought!  If I did, might my dreams, and even my shadow, reward me with clues, information, stories I have not heard, or other blessings. Remember, the ancient Greeks believed that a dream was a god in disguise!

    In order to mediate this process, during our seminar, we will reflect analytically on some dreams and stories, which show us how we—the ego consciousness—may be enlarged when we “greet the beggar at the door.”  We will also set aside times of silence for simplicity, introspection and journaling.   

    I hope you will join us for this Day with…the Stranger at the Door.

    Bonnie L. Damron, PhD, LCSW is a psychotherapist, ethnographer, storyteller, and Archetypal Pattern Analyst in private practice in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. During her thirty-four years in practice, she has conducted seminars on archetypal motifs in fairy tales, myths, the arts, and the writings of C.G. Jung. She also leads study tours to Crete and the Greek mainland. Dr. Damron holds a Masters of Social Work degree from Catholic University, a Doctoral Degree in American Culture Studies from the University of Maryland, and a Certificate as an Archetypal Pattern Analyst from the Assisi Institute for Archetypal Studies.

    • Thursday, September 27, 2018
    • Thursday, October 25, 2018
    • 4 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register
    Course

    “Grief is a secret art, not an art whose products should be sold or seen objectively.  Grieving is an art that when it is fully known and made to actually happen in all its grandeur and integrity, is the backbone of all real peace.”

      - Martin Prechtel,  The Smell of Rain on Dust

    Using myth, stories, dreams, and music, we will look at different forms of grief, which when experienced, accepted, and held in sacred space, leads to a return to life and praise.

    Anne Pickup, LCMFT  is a licensed psychotherapist in D.C. and Maryland with a Masters Degree in Marriage and Family Therapy. She received her Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles.  She is a founding member of the C.G. Jung Study Center of California, past president of the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts, and current president of the Jungian Analysts of the Washington Area.  She is a member of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts, and is secretary of the Kairos film project; preserving Jung.

    • Friday, September 28, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Butler Boardroom of the American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington D.C. 20016
    Register

    Lecture

    By witnessing the struggles of others, we gain pointers, insights, even strategies to address our own difficulties. Tonight we will examine three reports from the trenches, the never-ending wins and losses in the battle to survive, even make sense of one’s life.

    We will visit T. S. Eliot’s “J. Alfred Prufrock,” Jon Stallworthy’s “Letter from Berlin,” and Sharon Olds’ “I Go Back to May, 1937,” and learn from them what we can.

    (One can read these poems on the internet, and we will have copies available to share at the venue).

    James Hollis, Ph. D., is a Zurich-trained Jungian analyst in practice in Washington, D. C. where he is also Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington. He is also author of fourteen books translated into nineteen languages. 

    For directions to the Butler Boardroom of the American University, please click here.

    • Friday, October 05, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 9
    Register

    Film Night: SIX ON SHADOW: The Symbolism of Evil

    Tonight’s film with Mary Tomlinson and Murray Stein explores the symbolism of evil in religions, myths, fairytales, film, literature, and dreams.          

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.
    • Tuesday, October 09, 2018
    • Tuesday, October 30, 2018
    • 4 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    Register
    Course

    Using Dreams, we will explore the Jungian concepts of complexes, archetypes, and psychic energy.  Readings include Jung, CW 8, pp. 92-106 “A Review of the Complex Theory"; Jung, CW 9.1, pp. 3-41 “Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious"; and Jung, CW 8, pp. 3-66 “Psychic Energy.”

    Phyllis LaPlante, MSW, LCSW  is a certified Jungian Analyst and Licensed Clinical Social Worker. She received her Diploma from the C.G. Jung Institute of New York in 1998. She teaches courses in Jungian theory and practice. Semi-retired, she offers short-term consultation.

    • Friday, October 12, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 12
    Register

    An Evening With...

    “But the spirit of the depths teaches me that I am a servant, in fact the servant of a child: This dictum was repugnant to me and I hated it.  But I had to recognize and accept that my soul is a child and that my God in my soul is a child.” -Carl Jung, The Red Book, Liber Novus

    Before birth the child lies sleeping, then later, dreaming in the womb; the divine journey of the evolution of consciousness begins. Upon awakening in the chaos at birth, a drama unfolds: the psyche begins to develop the capacity to try to organize these events into dynamic, meaningful patterns. This begins a mobilization of feelings that become focused on the dramatic split between the omnipotent child, who is at once the center of the world, and the vulnerable dependent child, frustrated by chaos, abandonment, and deprivation. This split causes an interruption in the flow of libidinal energy between  inner and outer relationships and induces the first experiences of shame. The wounded child and the divine child exist in each cell of our body and in all psychic movement from birth to death. In this birthing of the alternation of these primal opposites, the life cycle of individuation is generated.   

    But just as the suffering and shame is present in every cell of our body, so are the seeds of conscious understanding and liberation that link us to our paradisal origins. Jung wrote, “If you marry the ordered to the chaos you produce the divine child, the supreme meaning beyond meaning and meaninglessness.” In tonight’s program, we will examine how the onset of individuation motivates the resolution of this tug of war between omnipotence and vulnerability so that we can become the willing “servant” of our own divine child. Shame can then become a guiding light on the path to release us from captivity.

    Timothy Lyons, LCSW, is a Jungian-oriented psychotherapist in private practice for individuals, couples and families in Capitol Hill, D.C. and Takoma Park, Maryland. He has a certificate for post graduate studies from the Philadelphia Jung Institute and is a frequent presenter at the Jung Society of Washington. His post graduate studies also include infant observation and art therapy. Tim’s work is further influenced by studies in Tibetan Buddhism, Taoism, and yoga philosophies, having completed teacher training in Trul Khor (Tibetan yoga). His earlier career as architect and editor includes writing for the Washington Post, and lecturing at the Smithsonian Institution.

    • Friday, October 19, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 10
    Register

    Film Night:  SIX ON SHADOW: Paranoia in Politics

    Tonight’s film with Luigi Zoja and Murray Stein explores paranoia as a political force in world history; cultural evil and the quest for dominance; war, empire building, and tribalisms.

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Wednesday, October 24, 2018
    • Wednesday, December 05, 2018
    • 6 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 14
    Register

    Course

    This course continues our reading and discussion of one of C.G. Jung’s most influential works: Psychology and
    Alchemy (CW 12). In this volume, Jung illustrates that (from the beginning) alchemy had a dual nature: chemical work on one hand and a psychological process on the other. He believed that the alchemical imagery and process was the result of the alchemist's projections of his own psychic processes onto the matter with which he worked. In both his personal and professional work with individuals, he noted that the alchemical imagery survives in the individual soul because of its source in the collective unconscious.

    This class series will cover chapters five (“The Lapis-Christ Parallel”) and six (“Alchemical Symbolism in the History of Religion”) in Part III: “Religious Ideas in Alchemy.” In these chapters, Jung parallels the description of the lapis, the philosopher’s stone (goal of the alchemical process), with the description of the nature and function of the Christ figure in Christianity. He also explores and amplifies the symbol of the unicorn with the intention of drawing explicit parallels to Christian imagery.

    The format of this course is class discussion based on the readings. We will take ample time for both the text and imagery. For the first class, please read in Chapter 5 of Part III, “The Lapis-Christ Parallel,” pp. 45 - 372.

    [For those wishing to participate in this class and are not familiar with C.G. Jung’s work or his approach to alchemy, you may find it helpful to also read Part I, “Introduction to the Religious and Psychological Problems of Alchemy,” and Part III, “Religious Ideas in Alchemy,” Chapters 1- 4 prior to the first class of this series.]

    Cathryn Polonchak,  L.C.S.W., is a certified Jungian Analyst and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of West Virginia.  She has a private practice in the Shepherdstown and the Charles Town/Harpers Ferry areas of West Virginia.  In addition to her membership in JAWA, Cathryn is a member of the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts (PAJA), the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts (IRSJA), the International Association of Analytical Psychology (IAAP), and the National Association of Social Workers (NASW).  She was the past Director of Seminar for PAJA.  She is interested in the interface between body and mind, particularly at the psyche-soma level of trauma.

    • Friday, October 26, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 11
    Register

    Film Night: SIX ON SHADOW: The Responsible Self

    Tonight’s film with Henry Abramovitch and Murray Stein explores a dynamic perspective of the responsible self; personal and collective evil; and the problem of ethics.

    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Thursday, November 01, 2018
    • Thursday, December 06, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 4
    Register
    Course

    This five-week class will be experiential in nature.  We will explore the interface between art therapy and Jungian analytical psychology, particularly as we work with dreams.  Jung considered dreams critical to the work of analysis.  Dreams were, he said, rites d’entresto the unconscious.  But in Memories, Dreams, Reflections, when he questioned his own passion for using art to explore messages from psyche, he stated emphatically that the villages he built from small stones, the paintings and drawings that he made, were also rites d’entres.  He said that whenever he came up against a blank wall in his work, he reached for his drawing materials, and in this way he found his way through being stuck and blocked in his thinking.

    Each participant will be asked to bring a dream that they would feel comfortable sharing with the group, and each will have an opportunity in the five weeks to present this dream.  The group will listen intently, especially to the imagery of the dream being shared.  Then the whole group will be invited to use basic art materials to draw the part of the dream that is most striking to them.  In this way we will explore what Jung called the symbolic attitude of the psyche.  We will have an opportunity to try active imagination and other ways of engaging with the dream.  It will give us a chance to experience Jung.

    We will use pastels and clay, basic art materials.  No previous experience with art is necessary. The invitation is to draw from the kid place. The intention of the class is to demonstrate how combining art therapy with Jungian theory can deepen and intensify the experience of analysis.  It will be soulful and creative.

    Sondra Geller,  MA, ATR-BC, LPC, is a Jungian Analyst, Board Certified Registered Art Therapist, and Licensed Professional Counselor.  She has a private practice in Washington, D.C., where she sees clients individually and in groups.  Her work reflects a synthesis of the principals of both Jungian Analytic Psychology and Art Therapy.  Sandy also teaches and presents experiential workshops focusing on the dynamics of making art in the presence of the analyst.  What happens in the silent space between client/artist and Jungian analyst/observer, and how does this dynamic facilitate the journey of individuation? 

    • Friday, November 02, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • The Library at the Jung Society, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 10
    Register

    Film Night: SIX ON SHADOW: The Shadow of Ecology

    Tonight’s film with Brigitte Egger and Murray Stein explores the shadow of humanity written on the planet, learning from ecological patterns. 


    April Barrett is in service to the dissemination of Jung's thought through her participation and training with the Creative Initiative Foundation, the Guild for Psychological Studies, and the Jung Society of Washington, for which she is program co-director and secretary/treasurer of the board.

    • Friday, November 09, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Jung Society Library, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016
    • 12
    Register

    An Evening With...

    When we receive a fatal diagnosis, or reach extreme old age, we must face the finality of our own impending death.  Coping with that harsh reality is one of the great challenges we face as human beings.  We can respond in ways that make the experience even more difficult.  Or we can choose a path that leads to finding greater meaning and purpose to our life even as it comes to a close.  In tonight’s conversation we will explore these different ways of coping with death, and how they can be used throughout our lifetimes to create a deeper, richer and more authentic experience of our life’s journey, no matter how long it may last.

    Mary Ann Melpolder has had a life-long interest in death, bereavement, and the survival of consciousness.  She holds Master's degrees in Thanatology from Hood College and in American Studies with a focus on warfare from the University of Maryland.  She served for two years as a hospice volunteer with Montgomery Hospice working with the dying and their families.  She is a member of the Association for Death, Education, and Counseling, and the International Association of Near-Death Studies.

    • Friday, November 16, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Butler Boardroom of the American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington D.C. 20016
    Register

    Lecture

    “I think best in wire,” Alexander Calder once said. In the act of manipulating the material of his creative practice, Calder is thinking. Indeed, the sculptor is suggesting an understanding of creativity distinct from popular assumptions about manifesting preconceived vision. Unlike Michelangelo, who claimed he saw the angel in the stone and then carved away until he set him free, most creative people work in very different ways. How might we imagine the kind of knowing, the different forms of understanding, revealed only through the creative process? How does our creative work – and our lives -- unfold in the making? The Forms of Things Unknown explores the revelatory nature of the creative journey itself.

    Lorne Buchman, PhD, is President of Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. He is a theater director and a teacher in literature and the arts. He has written on Shakespeare, film, contemporary drama, and is currently completing a book on the creative process.

    For directions to the Butler Boardroom of the American University, please click here.

    • Saturday, November 17, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • The Butler Boardroom of the American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington D.C. 20016
    Register

    Workshop

    “I think best in wire,” Alexander Calder once said. In the act of manipulating the material of his creative practice, Calder is thinking. Indeed, the sculptor is suggesting an understanding of creativity distinct from popular assumptions about manifesting preconceived vision. Unlike Michelangelo, who claimed he saw the angel in the stone and then carved away until he set him free, most creative people work in very different ways. How might we imagine the kind of knowing, the different forms of understanding, revealed only through the creative process? How does our creative work – and our lives -- unfold in the making? The Forms of Things Unknown explores the revelatory nature of the creative journey itself.

    The workshop will deepen the conversation through discussion and a variety of exercises of engagement. 

    Lorne Buchman, PhD, is President of Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. He is a theater director and a teacher in literature and the arts. He has written on Shakespeare, film, contemporary drama, and is currently completing a book on the creative process.

    For directions to the Butler Boardroom of the American University, please click here.

    • Friday, December 07, 2018
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • The Sanctuary of the Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Avenue N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016
    Register

    Lecture

    By aligning psycho-spiritual maturation with the natural process, our program envisages individuation as a path that embraces the inextricable relationship between life and death principles and assents to Creation as mystery. We will confront dominant cultural constructs that alienate us from the body and obstruct psyche’s connection with the non-human world. In hopes of redress, we construct an alternative model of consciousness, envisaging a nature-based-symbolic attitude that reconnects us with our roots in nature, conjoining mind, soul, and cosmos.

    In Friday’s lecture, Dr. Costello demonstrates how our environmental crisis and our collective fear of death stem from the same ideological root. She discusses our fear of change and our fear of loss—anxieties that stymie the spirit and inhibit growth.  She explores how changes in our bodies and in our life-circumstances may be harnessed as a motive-force for reconnecting us to our roots in nature, opening us to mystery, and honing our intentions in regard to self, others, and our work in the world.  

    Images, stories, and dream analysis will throw light on the archetypal forces--both fierce and generative—that promote psycho-spiritual maturation.  Special attention will be given to the recurrence of cosmological and elemental themes in dreams of individuals undergoing life-transition. 

    To promote awareness of the link between maturation of consciousness and our acceptance of natural cycles, Dr. Costello will lead a life-review meditation during Saturday’s workshop. We then discuss the varied archetypal energies that have informed our identities and chosen place in the world.  We consider: what is the purpose of longevity? What is wisdom?  We conclude by reconstructing our portrait of the individuated person, elucidating the nature-based dimensions of social, family and spiritual life. 

    Melanie Starr Costello, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist, historian, and senior Jungian analyst in private practice in Washington, D.C. She is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute-Zurich and earned her doctorate in the History and Literature of Religions from Northwestern University. She formerly served as Assistant Professor of History at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, was a Trustee for the Consortium for Psychoanalytic Research in Washington, D.C. and is currently Director of Education for the Jungian Analysts of Washington, a member of the Board of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York and a training analyst for the C.G. Jung Institute-Zurich.  Dr. Costello has taught and published on the topics of psychology and religion, medieval spirituality, aging and clinical practice. Her study of the link between illness and insight, entitled Imagination, Illness and Injury: Jungian Psychology and the Somatic Dimensions of Perception, is published by Routledge Press.

    For directions to the Butler Boardroom of the American University, please click here.

    • Saturday, December 08, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • The Memorial Hall of the Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, N.W. Washington D.C. 20016
    Register

    Workshop

    By aligning psycho-spiritual maturation with the natural process, our program envisages individuation as a path that embraces the inextricable relationship between life and death principles and assents to Creation as mystery. We will confront dominant cultural constructs that alienate us from the body and obstruct psyche’s connection with the non-human world. In hopes of redress, we construct an alternative model of consciousness, envisaging a nature-based-symbolic attitude that reconnects us with our roots in nature, conjoining mind, soul, and cosmos.

    In Saturday's workshop, Dr. Costello delves deeper into how our environmental crisis and our collective fear of death stem from the same ideological root. 

    To promote awareness of the link between maturation of consciousness and our acceptance of natural cycles, Dr. Costello will lead a life-review meditation during Saturday’s workshop. We then discuss the varied archetypal energies that have informed our identities and chosen place in the world.  We consider: what is the purpose of longevity? What is wisdom?  We conclude by reconstructing our portrait of the individuated person, elucidating the nature-based dimensions of social, family and spiritual life. 

    Melanie Starr Costello, Ph.D., a licensed psychologist, historian, and graduate of the C.G. Jung Institut-Zurich, holds a private practice off Dupont Circle in Washington, D.C.  She earned her doctorate in the History and Literature of Religions from Northwestern University.  A former Assistant Professor of History at St. Mary's College of Maryland, Dr. Costello has taught and published on the topics of psychology and religion, medieval spirituality, and clinical practice. Her study of the link between illness and insight entitled, Imagination, Illness and Injury: Jungian Psychology and the Somatic Dimensions of Perception, is published by Routledge press. Currently her work explores archetypal currents running through the collective psyche in our times—a topic she takes up in her workshops on the Stranger, Aging and Spirituality, and on Dream Cosmologies.


Please read before you register

The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit educational institution. Although many of the Jung Society's programs involve analytical psychology and allied subjects, these offerings are intended, and should be viewed, as a source of information and education, and not as therapy. The Jung Society does not offer psychoanalytical or other mental health services.

Cancellation Policy: Registration for Jung Society of Washington events may be canceled with a full refund until one week before the event's date. Thereafter, refunds are not available.

Please refrain from wearing intense perfumes and other fragrances when you attend our programs as some people may be sensitive to them. We thank you in advance.

OUR MISSION
The Jung Society of Washington brings the general public and professional community the insights and tools of analytic psychology and related disciplines. Through programs, classes, visiting speakers, partnerships with like organizations, and digital media, the Jung Society creates a platform for communal discussion regarding the personal and cultural issues that confront us. The tools these programs provide assist individuals, relationships, and societies in a dialogue that enhances understanding the unconscious dynamics that course through personal lives, cultural problems, and historic patterns.

JUNG SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON
5200 Cathedral Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20016
CALL: 202-237-8109
EMAIL: jungsociety@jung.org

OFFICE HOURS:
Monday - Thursday: 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
LIBRARY HOURS
Tuesday: 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM
EMAIL: junglibrary@jung.org

DIRECTIONS
BY CAR: From MacArthur Blvd., turn east (away from the Potomac River) onto Cathedral at the light between Loughboro and Arizona. 


BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT: D6 bus line.
Parking is available in the streets.
Entrance to the Jung Society library and office is from the side street, Hawthorne Place.


The Jung Society of Washington is a nonprofit educational institution. Although many of the Jung Society's programs involve analytical psychology and allied subjects, these offerings are intended, and should be viewed, as a source of information and education, and not as therapy. The Jung Society does not offer psychoanalytical or other mental health services.
Images of mandalas throughout this site were created by Carl Jung's patients between the years 1926 and 1945.

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